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Best thing for rust is to leave it outside and cold all winter long.
I second this...
Cold, and more importantly, dry air will help slow down corrosion. Salt doesn't cause rust, water and oxygen cause rust. Salt is just like a really bad influence that allows oxidation to happen faster. Salt and especially mag-chloride (both in road salt) are also hygroscopic (attract moisture.) Keeping the car dried out as much as possible rather than constantly damp in a luke-warm garage is preferred.

Only when the car is really caked in road salt will I rinse it with Salt-Away and then let it freeze up and dry out in the cold, dry winter air.
 

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To me, it's a car, not an investment. Winter driving for sure. I even drove my s2000 in the winter in the metro Detroit area. That definitely got sketchy. I ended up getting a winter car for that one though.
 

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You may also be interested....Michelin sport tires should not be “dropped, or moved“ below 20*F. They should be warmed slowly to 40*F to avoid internal damage. This comes from Michelin.
 

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While I am firmly in the "drive it like you stole it" and "summer cars should be RWD" camps, I live in the burbs and don't spend much time on the highways. If your drive time is mostly bumper to bumper red light to red light traffic with no where to park, I'd suggest moving or getting a beater better suited to the urban hell scape that is chicago.

Another option is undercoating. I had mine done with cosmoline by a crazy old guy in eau claire wisconsin.

 

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Thanks for this thread and the contributions. I have decided not to heat my garage this winter. As a result of comments, I really hit the books & dug deep into the heat vs cold question. (Googled it) Anyway no heat won. The gas bill will be less, so my wife was happy with the decision too.
 

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Thanks for this thread and the contributions. I have decided not to heat my garage this winter. As a result of comments, I really hit the books & dug deep into the heat vs cold question. (Googled it) Anyway no heat won. The gas bill will be less, so my wife was happy with the decision too.
Happy wife, happy life ! She’ll find something to spend that savings on.
 

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The RS is too fun in the snow to store, the AWD just grips with the right tires, even with All seasons I ran last winter season. With snow tires it will be a beast. Check your factory skid plate condition if it's still good or nah, only reason I replaced mine is because it's already torn.

Of course, just try to wash the car as much as you can if the weather is above freezing, or else just take it to a touchless wash to rinse the salt out
 

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I second this...
Cold, and more importantly, dry air will help slow down corrosion. Salt doesn't cause rust, water and oxygen cause rust. Salt is just like a really bad influence that allows oxidation to happen faster. Salt and especially mag-chloride (both in road salt) are also hygroscopic (attract moisture.) Keeping the car dried out as much as possible rather than constantly damp in a luke-warm garage is preferred.

Only when the car is really caked in road salt will I rinse it with Salt-Away and then let it freeze up and dry out in the cold, dry winter air.
This makes sense and explains why I didn't see a ton of extra wear. The more you know.

I will say thinking back on it a bit more, I did make sure to also fill in places where the paint broke/chipped immediately on the car specifically to prevent rust. One thing that comes to mind is any place where the body panels meet and are in tension (like where the bumpers meet the front and rear quarter panels on my ST). Overall, the car held up pretty well for the 4 years I owned it. I assume the RS will do more of the same.
 

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I've done the winter hideaway with other cars. I specifically bought the RS for a fun all-year car.

It's a mechanical object. Even if you store it, it will eventually break down. Why not enjoy it for now and worry about a new platform/upgrade in the future?
 

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Driven my car for 3 winters now. I play hard and then take care of it after the fact. From daily driving on highways for hours to the mountains, logging roads, and on frozen lakes cutting lap after lap. Love it. It's a great time to wake up as an RS owner with fresh powder outside. I have more fun driving it in the winter over the summer. I suggest an aluminum skid plate if nothing else. Watch the brakes when you fill them with snow and ice. They act FROZEN for a split second. Ultimately, enjoy it imo. A nice set of winter tires and smiles for miles. 20180127_135226.jpg
 

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You may also be interested....Michelin sport tires should not be “dropped, or moved“ below 20*F. They should be warmed slowly to 40*F to avoid internal damage. This comes from Michelin.
I asked one of the Michelin CSRs about material data sheet on the PSS tires and they told me that this was "confidential information" so I'm not sure what the exact temperatures the tires can actually be driven in.

From personal experience, it drops to mid to high 30s here in the winter and I drive my car without any issues so far.
 

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I asked one of the Michelin CSRs about material data sheet on the PSS tires and they told me that this was "confidential information" so I'm not sure what the exact temperatures the tires can actually be driven in.

From personal experience, it drops to mid to high 30s here in the winter and I drive my car without any issues so far.
Depending on tire manufacturers needs the additives go in an order of 1: TDAE ( wet grip non frozen road conditions blends), 2: RAE(all season blends), 3: MES (winter tire blends), 4: EPDM (rubber hoses and belts). Depending on the quality of the blend that get saturated with TDAE, RAE or MES the other ingredients are primarily sulfur, carbon black, rubber the tires have a good mix across the range. TDAE which is good for abrasion resistance, low temperature flexibility, extended tire life mixed make some of the summer tires Michelin manufacturers work well in below 40 degree conditions provided the road is not frozen. I currently run the pilot sport 4S and have for 2 years ish now. Even in frozen condition I have not had an issue except for the vehicle ride height hindering my ability to make it through deep snow drifts on the roads.


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Another rust belt problem is pot holes. The water freezes, expands and destroys the roads.
The plows scrape any summer patches off almost immediately. The lumps go from convex to concave. It also goes deeper, below the pavement. Frost depth here is 4 feet. The roads heave.
Take road trip to N. central Pa. and drive Rt, 219 S. from Rt, 86 E/W to the Pa. line. Friends of friends blew out a windshield on an FJ Cruiser. Now that’s what I call bottoming out!
In the summer there are places I can’t drive, let alone winter.
edit : Remember where the OP lives.
I don’t know about other state‘s yearly insp ., but Pa. includes rust parameters.
 

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You might get a wide range of opinions on subject of preserving the car vs using the car. Personally, I bought mine with the intent of enjoying it in all seasons. I can understand folks that want to preserve their cars forever, but life is short and the most fun I've had with the RS is on snow and ice. On snow and ice you can enjoy the car without burning through tires. I have immense appreciation for the dynamic AWD system in low-traction situations.
Salt and grit are there and will make the undercarriage rustier than a garaged car, but it isn't going to fall apart with care, I do what I can to slow it.

Here are a couple cheap things I've done to prevent winter damage and slow rust propagation:
  • Thin PPF strips on the wheel arches to prevent chips and future rust points.
  • Installed the euro RS OEM rear wheel arch/bumper crack protectors; they keep grit from getting stuck where the rear bumper meets the metal wheel arch and abrading the paint and rusting out. They're like little baby mud flaps for a very key spot. Pic below.
  • Epoxied the undertray - made it through 2 winters without issue, but finally upgraded to aluminum for further protection.
  • Hand wash the car when possible in the winter, including undercarriage rinse with Salt-Away.
  • My garage isn't heated, which is good for slowing any rusting.
To wash the car in the winter when it gets really salty I made a cheap PVC under carriage washer that I connect a Salt-Away applicator to. I bought a small pump, expanding hose and bucket lid off Amazon and I fill a few 5 gal buckets with warm water to dissolve rust more easily. The Salt-Away aids in dissolving the rust and leaves a coating preventing salt from seeping back in as easily. I think it's also important not to wash the car too often.

Here's a link to a quick how-to of what I use for washing in the winter in the cold:
DIY system for rinsing salt off your car in the cold
View attachment 344773

Here's the part #'s for those rear bumper crack protectors:
G1EY-17F766-AA and G1EY-17F767-AA
View attachment 344774
Would you have a link to the proper parts catalog for these little crack guards? Much appreciated, thanks
 
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