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To warm up or just drive?

  • Warm up

    Votes: 38 47.5%
  • Just drive it

    Votes: 42 52.5%

  • Total voters
    80
  • Poll closed .
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Big topic again! Who warms up their car? A lot of people don't around me. I let me car idle for about 15 minutes then I drive it as slow as possible until its warm. What about any of you? Will the RS see idle time or 30 seconds and drive?
 

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Warm up from cold minimum 2-3 min. Then drive normally.
:)
 

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Idle for 15 mins? Isn't that overkill?

I warm it up for a min or so and drive off boost gently until up to temp. Idling only would not warm up the gearbox or other drivetrain components either.
 

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My routine is to get in, start, plug phone in, set radio, seat belt, then drive. So the car will idle for about a minute if that. The only time this changes is when it's below 10. Where I may let it idle for ~2 minutes. Anything more is a waste of fuel IMO.

I work night shift and get off work at 7am. So the last thing I want to do is sit at work in my car for 10 more minutes than I need to. My car is garage kept at home.
 

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Modern engines don't need a big warm up, as long as you don't thrash it as you're driving off or rev it too much straight away. I start and drive my ST straight away from cold, but keep the revs to a minimum until I see the oil temperature gauge move in the right direction. On the the other hand, older engines, particularly those with cast iron blocks do need a decent warm up. My 1972 Chrysler V8 with its cast iron block and carburettor, needs a good prescribed warm up, from full choke to a tap on the accelerator to bring down the revs, hold it in that pattern and tap again after about 45 seconds and let it idle and wait for the temp needle to move away from cold. All up around 5 minutes. They also run hot and maintain the heat when switched off and engine cooling isn't up to the standard of modern cars. Not surprisingly though they get you from point A to point B in a style that is all too uncommon these days.............
 

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I like to see the temp gauge move up a little before I drive and then I am easy on it until within operating range. If I have to leave right away for time restraints I've very easy on it until temp gauge is moving.
 

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< a minute idle, then drive but not hard... I tend to stay out of boost until I see the coolant temp rise and even then I don't push it so hard for some time. The oil takes longer than the coolant to warm up so even if its reading normal temp I still wait a few minutes more before I get into boost.
 

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Team O'Neil Rally School
January 23 at 12:47pm ·
Please, warm your car up in the winter, despite what you may have recently heard in the press. Here's why.
Metals expand and contract at different rates, based on temperature. Aluminum, for example, contracts about twice as much as steel at low temperatures. This means that crucial tolerances, like those between your crankshaft and bearings, can be VERY tight at low temps. Does your car turn over slowly in the winter even with thin oil? It's because your engine is basically almost seized as some parts have contracted more than others.
You probably also have aluminum pistons in steel cylinders, which expand and contract at very different rates. At cold temps, your aluminum piston will contract more than the steel cylinder, creating a larger than normal gap between your pistons and cylinder walls. Do a compression test on a cold engine and you'll see what we're talking about.
What's worse is that your pistons will expand much quicker than your cylinder walls and block, because the pistons are small and light, and the block is big and heavy. This means that your pistons will be at full size, and the cylinders that they travel in will be smaller than normal. There is a window of time when your pistons are warm but your block is still cold, and revving or putting load on your engine while it has these extra-tight piston clearances isn't good for anything.
Your engine block, heads, crankshaft, cylinders, pistons, piston rings, camshafts, valves, bearings, etc are all made of different metals that are effected very differently by heat and cold. It was designed with a reasonable operating temperature range in mind, and we as drivers need to respect that and avoid driving outside this temperature range whenever possible.


This was posted by Team O'Neil Rally school, I would respect and follow what they say.
 

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I don't know the answer to this. For every article or "science" saying to warm it up, there's another saying don't and there's hundreds if not thousands of each.
I don't warm mine up for more than 30 seconds and I just drive it nice and easy until the engine is warm and have never had an issue.

The one thing I will say is please, for the sake of what's left of our planet, don't idle your car for 15 minutes.
 

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If I could some how have remote start I would warm it up but I just get in and go. Not much cold weather in Louisiana though lol
 

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You don't think the engineers consider material expansion rates in their designs? That's pretty basic stuff to consider, and yes while some metals expand at different rates the deltas between coeffencients of expansion of the temperatures you may see (let's say -20 C to operating temperature of 90 C) you're talking 1/10ths of mm differences which I'm sure is well within tolerances.

On my current car (2010 Mitsubishi Lancer) I've always driven off shortly after starting, unless I've needed to brush the car off, on the coldest days we've had here in Canada. Never failed to start and never had issues. I just avoid any high revs until the engine's warmed up.
 

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Big topic again! Who warms up their car? A lot of people don't around me. I let me car idle for about 15 minutes then I drive it as slow as possible until its warm. What about any of you? Will the RS see idle time or 30 seconds and drive?
Base on ambient temperature my warmup time is much closer to 30 seconds than 15 minutes. :smug:

YMMV,

MidCow3 :watermelon:
 

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This is real simple...

Push the button and wait until your car goes threw it's own "warm up" and settles the needle at 800~900rpms. A typical car goes threw it's own warm up in about 30s.. if it is colder, it may take longer. Before you drive away, give a mild rev to mid range, then you are good to go & put it in gear.



The first 5m of driving should be relaxed, and after that (6m ~ 10m) you should be able to beat on any engine. Depending on how cold it was at start up.
 

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I warm up my vehicle for about 10 mins, this is enough time for the coolant temp to be around 120 when I start to drive. My ST doesn't like anything below 150 or I have to short shift, other wise it lean burns for centuries and I literally wait for ever before I can rev match to the next gear. I should state I have a very short commute to my work about 4 mins of highway, if I didn't warm my vehicle up the oil would never get up to temp not even close.

The other thing to consider even if you are moving your vehicle I would warm it up as well. Any one with a Rotary knows what I'm talking about. It gets pretty chilly by me and if you start up your vehicle, move it, then shut it off when it's below 50 out, let alone below 20, then you are just filling the cylinders with unburned fuel that will seep down and sit in your oil. My work had an S10 that we used for trash, no one ever warmed it or let it run enough during the winter months. When we would change the oil you could smell the gas in the oil. When the engine finally went there was more gas in the oil then oil lol.
 

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My RS will likely arrive when the winter breaks so likely 30 seconds and drive for me at first. If not I'll let it run for a few minutes in the morning while I scrape snow off/finish waking up and then once I get on the highway the RS experience will start :smug:
 

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I wait maybe 30 sec. then drive, but don't do performance driving until all the temps are up to where they belong. Since I don't blast around in my neighborhood, I get a cool-down period before shutting the car down, too.

Jim
 
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