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I mean of course he can say that we don't drive it hard enough to trigger the event, but it is a straight line pull. Like I was saying I've never experienced that and I've taken mine to the track. Definitely wrung out 2nd and 3rd there so while I'm not a Ford tech, I doubt the car is software programmed to veer under acceleration.
 

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Yes I get the wiggle as well under max acceleration on public roads. Don’t try to counter it because you just make it worse. Hold the steering wheel straight like you mean it and the car goes straight as an arrow. I can’t repeat this too much, do NOT try to counter it, just HOLD the wheel straight. The car tracks straight with no issues at WOT on a flat groomed track.
 

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I'll repeat it once more. Don't counter it. It's the same thing an ST does, except it's worse with FWD only. Relax and don't fight it.
 

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I'm convinced it is the torque vectoring parameters interpreting the car is turning and overdriving the outside rear wheel.

I also feel it is most pronounced in drift mode.

Mine isn't sensitive to tyre pressure and hill start seem to make no difference.
 

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I'm convinced it is the torque vectoring parameters interpreting the car is turning and overdriving the outside rear wheel.

I also feel it is most pronounced in drift mode.

Mine isn't sensitive to tyre pressure and hill start seem to make no difference.
It's not just over driving the rear wheel, the computer also compensates through the electric power steering, which is what makes it snatch back and forth.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I mean of course he can say that we don't drive it hard enough to trigger the event, but it is a straight line pull. Like I was saying I've never experienced that and I've taken mine to the track. Definitely wrung out 2nd and 3rd there so while I'm not a Ford tech, I doubt the car is software programmed to veer under acceleration.
Of course it's not programmed to veer but it's an event that does happen under the right circumstances.
Yes I get the wiggle as well under max acceleration on public roads. Don’t try to counter it because you just make it worse. Hold the steering wheel straight like you mean it and the car goes straight as an arrow. I can’t repeat this too much, do NOT try to counter it, just HOLD the wheel straight. The car tracks straight with no issues at WOT on a flat groomed track.
I don't think you can have experienced exactly what I'm describing as if you think you can just hang on and not counter steer, I assure you it would end up in an accident. The veer is severe and the only way to bring the car back into line is to back off the throttle and counter. Of course I agree this counter steer exaggerates the issue and creates the oscillating effect but what else are you supposed to do.

I'll repeat it once more. Don't counter it. It's the same thing an ST does, except it's worse with FWD only. Relax and don't fight it.
AS above.

Rear bushing inserts.
@bigmiketino and @tedsRS both reported less squirm under throttle and cornering.

https://www.focusrs.org/forum/16-focus-rs-performance/70818-rear-diff-inserts-2.html
Thanks.

I'm convinced it is the torque vectoring parameters interpreting the car is turning and overdriving the outside rear wheel.

I also feel it is most pronounced in drift mode.

Mine isn't sensitive to tyre pressure and hill start seem to make no difference.
Yes there definite a conflict in the way the cars electronics id interpreting what is actually happening and the neccessary counter steer confuses things further.

It's not just over driving the rear wheel, the computer also compensates through the electric power steering, which is what makes it snatch back and forth.
I also think it's a combination of drive and steering not in symmetry.
 

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Try Track mode + normal dampers + traction control single click on.

Rear end wander reduced/eliminated with this mode select 'in my experience'.

Tramlining is real w/stock wheels + tires.

All that said the 'pull under throttle' is real. Hang on.
 

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Yes, I will confirm car does get a bit squirrelly when changing lanes under full power. (Full sideways at 70MPH) I have found that entering any enhanced driving mode or running my winters (245/40/18 on 19lbs Enkei) made it worse. I leaned that if I am passing, to roll on the throttle a bit slower and definitely don't go WOT until I have the car straight in the lane.

I have taken the Focus down the strip several times and for the most part if you start straight it will go straight. The issue is the vectoring system reacts faster than you can compensate. If you hold the wheel straight and let off slightly it will sort itself out.

I own an 89 CHP mustang that has very bad manners when the rear breaks loose. Learned real quick to let off and then nail the throttle while keeping the wheel held straight. Most of the YouTube videos show drivers that haven't learned this YET.
 

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Yes I get the wiggle as well under max acceleration on public roads. Don’t try to counter it because you just make it worse. Hold the steering wheel straight like you mean it and the car goes straight as an arrow. I can’t repeat this too much, do NOT try to counter it, just HOLD the wheel straight. The car tracks straight with no issues at WOT on a flat groomed track.
I'll repeat it once more. Don't counter it. It's the same thing an ST does, except it's worse with FWD only. Relax and don't fight it.
I don't think you can have experienced exactly what I'm describing as if you think you can just hang on and not counter steer, I assure you it would end up in an accident. The veer is severe and the only way to bring the car back into line is to back off the throttle and counter. Of course I agree this counter steer exaggerates the issue and creates the oscillating effect but what else are you supposed to do.
I agree with the OP that corrective action is at least sometimes necessary to counter this behaviour. When I have experienced the veering in my car, it can usually be managed as @FORZDA 2 and @ProfessorFate say - if I (try to) keep the wheel straight, the car will squirm about but generally go where intended. Not optimal, but manageable. However, I did have one incident shortly after break in (and this has not happened again in ~12 months since) where the car made a sudden and much larger than usual (~4 foot) lateral deviation that put me into the neighbouring lane before I had a chance to react. The only sensible response on that occasion was to lift off the accelerator and counter steer. Since then I have been extra cautious about where and when to nail the throttle.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I agree with the OP that corrective action is at least sometimes necessary to counter this behaviour. When I have experienced the veering in my car, it can usually be managed as @FORZDA 2 and @ProfessorFate say - if I (try to) keep the wheel straight, the car will squirm about but generally go where intended. Not optimal, but manageable. However, I did have one incident shortly after break in (and this has not happened again in ~12 months since) where the car made a sudden and much larger than usual (~4 foot) lateral deviation that put me into the neighbouring lane before I had a chance to react. The only sensible response on that occasion was to lift off the accelerator and counter steer. Since then I have been extra cautious about where and when to nail the throttle.
That's my whole point you shouldn't have to fear where you nail the throttle. Obviously you will get different reactions depending on road conditions but it should always be predictable imo.
 

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Try the inserts from flexpower, its an easy mod with the right tool. I was thinking about this thread and really trying to reproduce the problem and mostly can't. I have done the following: coils, sway bars, TB rdu brace, flexpower rdu bushings (race). All of my driving is done in drift w/ all assists off. Still planning on scheduling the pdc disable someday.
 

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I havent seen anyone else mention this yet but I have had some minor success with getting rid of some of the issue by using the custom drive mode in SeniorGeeks thread on this forum.

My minor fix I have MPSS set ti 41/39 psi, awd mode to "drift" while leaving normal suspension and steering. Exhaust and throttle mapping is in sport and esc remains on.

For me in this state the car acts more like a RWD car under heavy acceleration, the pogo effect is a bit more pronounced but the car tracks much straighter for me.

As always ymmv.
 

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Sounds similar to what your experience with 4WD in the snow. Keep the wheel pointed where you want to go, give the vehicle a moment to gather itself. I did an abrupt Lane change at part throttle, thought I observed and did a wiggle when I quickly adjusted. Rather than chase the car, after my first exaggerated correction, I did two slight ones which allowed the car to track fairly straight rather than react to wild settings.
 

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I've experienced this plenty of times in my 17 RS. I can't remember it happening on any roads other than highly traveled and worn asphalt. Highways, it hasn't been an issue. One thing that absolutely reduces the zig zag steering is a long press on the ESC off button. Regardless of drive mode, turning all ESC off seems to calm the veering down significantly. I do not use hill assist but I have the veering issue when ESC is on or ESC on (track mode). Again, ESC has to be completely off for the veering steering to be greatly reduced.
 

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The only time I had felt something similar as described is on my 400mi drive home from the dealer. Coming from a RWD car (BRZ), I was used to having to "catch" the rear when going on freeway on/off ramps, specially during inclimate weather. The RS felt like it would "shimmy" when ever I tried to change lanes or when going on an on-ramp (power on+slight steering input). This seemed to happen on both flat and severely crowned pavement. I later found that I still had the shipping blocks on and that tire pressures were severely over inflated and uneven (high of 46psi, low of 36psi, different in all 4 corners). I haven't noticed it ever since I took the shipping blocks and ran 41/38 psi front/back.

I would still feel a slight tug (I'm guessing torque steer) when going full throttle on a flat road (ie data logging, etc) but no where close to the uneasiness I felt when it was new.
 

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"But officer, I was data logging . . ."

I believe the veering may be related to the 'robot side' of the RS as opposed to torque steer, or tram lining. Hard to tell. I may have experienced 'veering' but cannot recreate that sensation. I did notice a rear end 'wander' in sweeper turns.

Track mode + esc one click on + normal dampers = less 'robot' for Me
 

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The first time it happened, I was on the highway and I pressed the throttle 3/4 and it moved left towards the wall and then quickly right. I was quick on my toes and kept in check whilst releasing a bit of the throttle.
That moment reminded me that I am not driving a 1.0 Ecoboost and I need to be awake when i am almost WOT.

A few weeks ago I was racing someone on the bahn and this time was WOT in 5th gear and the car veered left and right. This happened at over 170 km/h so my corrections had to be swift as I had a Type R to my right.


Since then, I expect it to happen and when it does not, I am surprised. This car, like any performance car, can pretty much kill you if you do not pay attention. Furthermore, I have always associated this to torque steer because my previous Focus Diesel that was tuned had a similar thing under WOT.
 
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