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Discussion Starter #1
Just wanted to open a discussion on the RS Fog Lamp setup. With all my cars, I like to put yellow fog lamps in. I know the RS has LED fogs, but what I'm wondering if it is one or 2 bulbs per fog? All pictures I have seen appear to have 2 per. That would really make my PIAA LED conversion VEEEERY expensive...
 

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The RS uses halogen fogs, not LED and it's one bulb per side, it just looks kind of funky because of a cover over the bulb that makes it looks like two separate light patterns.

I also plan to convert mine to yellow PIAA LED bulbs :cool:

View attachment FordAA-2015_016.jpg
 

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Why yellow?

Edit: out of curiosity googled some stuff, found this fascinating article
Daniel Stern Lighting Consultancy and Supply
I'm glad I'm not the only one who's found fog lights totally useless.

If people want to put in yellow fog lights because there's a theoretical benefit then go for it, but in my opinion they're there just to look cool. I've driven in really intense fog (just last week in fact) and the fogs don't help one bit. Even with the absurd amount of reflection/diffusion from the fog my low beams were better than fogs only. Personally, I'll get some bulbs that color match the HID headlamps and call it a day.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The RS uses halogen fogs, not LED and it's one bulb per side, it just looks kind of funky because of a cover over the bulb that makes it looks like two separate light patterns.
Funny, I could've sworn the RS has LED fog lamps. Now I'll DEFINITELY be changing them. Thanks for the info.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm glad I'm not the only one who's found fog lights totally useless.

If people want to put in yellow fog lights because there's a theoretical benefit then go for it, but in my opinion they're there just to look cool. I've driven in really intense fog (just last week in fact) and the fogs don't help one bit. Even with the absurd amount of reflection/diffusion from the fog my low beams were better than fogs only. Personally, I'll get some bulbs that color match the HID headlamps and call it a day.
That is your opinion. The reason why yellow fogs are good to have is because in conditions where you need them (i.e. heavy rain, sleet, snow, fog, etc.) yellow light is reflected less by the water molecules in the air than the full spectrum of white light. What this means is a fully yellow output (given an equal overall output from white to yellow) gives you better visibility in inclement weather and in extreme snow/rain/fog greatly reduces the amount of glare you would experience using white lights. That study doesn't take into account this factor in its explanation. Yes, obviously you won't see as far with fog lamps. That's not what they are designed for. But in Michigan, I definitely notice a difference in near-distance road visibility (especially the lines) in heavy snow/rain/fog. It's all subjective of course, just explaining I don't just do it because its a fad.
 

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I'm glad I'm not the only one who's found fog lights totally useless.

If people want to put in yellow fog lights because there's a theoretical benefit then go for it, but in my opinion they're there just to look cool. I've driven in really intense fog (just last week in fact) and the fogs don't help one bit. Even with the absurd amount of reflection/diffusion from the fog my low beams were better than fogs only. Personally, I'll get some bulbs that color match the HID headlamps and call it a day.
Golf R doesn't have them.

I like them on my ST as driving lights during the day. I replaced the original with white LEDs.

For seeing the best yellow has most visibility. But actually like the article above, I have found fog lights pretty useless if your intent is better road illumination.


YMMV,

MidCow3
 

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That is your opinion. The reason why yellow fogs are good to have is because in conditions where you need them (i.e. heavy rain, sleet, snow, fog, etc.) yellow light is reflected less by the water molecules in the air than the full spectrum of white light. What this means is a fully yellow output (given an equal overall output from white to yellow) gives you better visibility in inclement weather and in extreme snow/rain/fog greatly reduces the amount of glare you would experience using white lights. That study doesn't take into account this factor in its explanation. Yes, obviously you won't see as far with fog lamps. That's not what they are designed for. But in Michigan, I definitely notice a difference in near-distance road visibility (especially the lines) in heavy snow/rain/fog. It's all subjective of course, just explaining I don't just do it because its a fad.
Yep, I'm pretty sure I said "in my opinion" and I'm pretty sure I also said that "there's a theoretical benefit". I've used yellow fogs and white fogs and observed no practical difference in visibility. Everyone's eye's are different. If you want to put them on then... as I said... "go for it".
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yep, I'm pretty sure I said "in my opinion" and I'm pretty sure I also said that "there's a theoretical benefit". I've used yellow fogs and white fogs and observed no practical difference in visibility. Everyone's eye's are different. If you want to put them on then... as I said... "go for it".
Sorry man, not trying to be a jerk or anything haha. Just trying to explain I'm not just chasing a fad is all. That and I'm a little disappointed in the fact that article didn't factor in the yellow/white conversation. Would have made it a lot more interesting and provided a little scientific proof or disproof (for lack of a better word) behind the yellow fog theory. Enjoy your RS sir!
 

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Sorry man, not trying to be a jerk or anything haha. Just trying to explain I'm not just chasing a fad is all. That and I'm a little disappointed in the fact that article didn't factor in the yellow/white conversation. Would have made it a lot more interesting and provided a little scientific proof or disproof (for lack of a better word) behind the yellow fog theory. Enjoy your RS sir!
Sorry, the tonality came across a lot different in my head I guess.
 

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Light Colors

Summary: Yellow color removes blue-violet color which reduces glare in inclement weather. 4300K Kelvin HID is the brightest light and is close to natural sunlight in color. It OEM color for HID headlights.



Selective yellow source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_yellowlue-violet v

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Selective yellow (desaturated approximation)

About these coordinates Colour coordinates
Hex triplet #FFBA00
sRGBB (r, g, b) (255, 186, 0)
CMYKH (c, m, y, k) (0, 27, 100, 0)
HSV (h, s, v) (44°, 100%, 100%)
Source CIECD
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)
One of the first optic headlamp lenses, the Corning Conaphore made of selective yellow "Noviol" glass.

Selective yellow is a color for automotive lamps, particularly headlamps and other road-illumination lamps such as fog lamps. Under ECE regulations, headlamps were formerly permitted to be either white or selective yellow—in France, selective yellow was mandatory for all vehicles' road-illumination lamps until 1993.

Both the internationalized European ECE Regulation 19 and North American SAE standard J583 permit selective yellow front fog lamps. ECE Regulation 48 currently[when?] requires new vehicles to be equipped with headlamps emitting white light. However, selective yellow headlamps remain permitted throughout Europe on vehicles already so equipped, as well as in non-European locales such as Japan and New Zealand.

The intent of selective yellow is to improve vision by removing short, blue to violet wavelengths from the projected light. These wavelengths are difficult for the human visual system to process properly, and they cause perceived dazzle and glare effects in rain, fog and snow.Removing the blue-violet portion of a lamp's output to obtain selective yellow light can entail filter losses of around 15%, though the effect of this reduction is mitigated or countervailed by the increased visual acuity available with yellow rather than white light in bad weather.
==================================================================================

HID Light Colors: Source: HID Bulb Colors & Kelvin Temperatures | HeadlightRetrofits.com


HID Kelvin Color

We often get the question: “Doesn’t a higher number mean it’s brighter or better ?”. The short answer – NO. When talking about an HID bulb Kelvin Color temperature, a 4100-4300K HID bulb is the brightest Kelvin Temperature you can get. This is the OEM coloring specification on most vehicles with factory HID headlights for a reason.

Let’s explain…

Light output is measured in luminosity or lumens. A 4300k HID bulb at 35 watts generally produces 3200-3400 lumens of light. As Kelvin Color Temperature starts to go up (5000k, 6000k and above) luminosity decreases.

A 5000k HID bulb at 35 watts generally produces 3000 lumens and a 6000k HID bulb at 35 watts generally produces in the 2800 lumen range. The lumen output above 6000k starts to dramatically decrease, which is why we never recommend anything above 6000k for an HID bulb. Anything above 6000k should be regarded as cosmetic or show only.

“Why do my friend’s headlights look brighter than mine and he has xxxx-K temperature bulbs???”- The reason higher Kelvin bulbs may appear brighter is that they are actually glaring more off of the road surface. Glare is NOT how light output is measured. It’s annoying, obnoxious and dangerous. Anything above a 6000K color rating is extremely ineffective & can be deemed practically useless. 6000K is generally the highest Kelvin rating you can go without creating too much glare. The higher the Kelvin rating, the lower the lumen output is. (We can’t stress this fact enough…so we noted it twice)

When the Kelvin rating is above 6000K, generally the lumen rating is around 2000 or below. This actually puts the HID output level back in the category of Halogen Output.

3000k CutoffWhat about 3000K HID bulbs? A 3000K HID bulb is designed for foul-weather or fog situations. 3000K produces a yellow light that cuts through rain, snow & fog better than a white light.
Kelvin Colors with Pictures

3000k Kelvin Coloring - Yellow

3000K Has a strict yellow output. This is ideal for use in fog lights or foul weather. The yellow light cuts through rain, snow, sleet & fog more effectively than a white light.







4300k Kelvin Coloring off-white



4300K OEM coloring. Has a slightly off-white output very close to that of natural sunlight. All cars with OEM Factory HID headlights use 4300K bulbs. This is the Kelvin color if you are after maximum light output.







5000k Kelvin Coloring - Pure White

5000K A great compromise. Has a pure white output, no tinge of yellow and no tinge of blue. This is a great “middle-ground” Kelvin color as it’s appealing and still very bright. Note the pure white light directly next to the bulb in the photo.



6000k Kelvin Coloring -White with blue tinge





6000K The highest Kelvin color you should go. Has a crisp white out with a more blue hue in the color spectrum. While these bulbs are bright and still rank high on the Lumen-output scale, this is the highest Kelvin rating anyone should use without sacrificing output quality.



8000k Kelvin Coloring - Purple



8000K This Kelvin color was included for display purposes only. Note the excessive glare & high amount of blue coloring. This bulb (and anything above it) are NOT recommended for any application.











YMMV,

MidCow3
 

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I'll be installing a pair of Cree LEDs to color match the Osram HID's and DRL's. There usefulness goes out the window, the minute a pair of OSRAM HID's are installed.
 

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I'll be doing yellow bulbs. I have some cheap Nokians(?) on my GTI that have lasted 4 years.

Yellow works very well in the snow IMO.

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I've had times where it's snowing so hard that driving with the four ways provided better illumination than the headlights
 

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Golf R doesn't have them.

I like them on my ST as driving lights during the day. I replaced the original with white LEDs.

For seeing the best yellow has most visibility. But actually like the article above, I have found fog lights pretty useless if your intent is better road illumination.


YMMV,

MidCow3
Agree. I've never had a car with stock fog lights that was worth a darn. Real fog lights, though, are pretty effective. PIAAs, Cibie, etc. ...if you can live with the rally look on the street.
 

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On my race car I have the old Bosch Pilot 150 (I think, rectangular lights) found on many 80s imports. I have both the clear and yellow lenses. The white I like using as city lights, but the yellow when it is really foggy (rare here) seam to work better, if I leave the headlights off. I do have 100W H3 bulbs in mine. I have H4 headlight conversion kit too, so with high beams and fogs on I'm just shy of 400W forward lighting. high beams give me range down the road while the fogs give me angle for animals and people.
 

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I like HID 3000k green/yellow on fogs.

The stock RS comes with LED fogs.
See my post on the 1st page, the RS does NOT come with LED fog lamps, they're halogen.

I have 3000k HID bulbs in the factory fog lamps (I know that's usually a no-no, but the glare isn't bad at all) on my Super Duty and they make a difference and compliment the Osram HID projector converted headlamps I have (4300k). They've really helped me most in heavy snowfall, and being originally from Buffalo, I'm talking you can't see the end of your hood snow!
 
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