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Discussion Starter #1
So we all have heard that after about 30 minutes of track time the RDU may shut down and the car becomes a front drive, till it cools off. My question is can driving on slick surfaces, i.e. Snow, ice covered roads also stress out the RDU and cause it to shut down? Sometimes I have to drive more than 30 minutes in the snow and all that slipping and sliding had me thinking that this may be an issue? Or does the fact that it's cool outside, to have snow, as opposed to hot when tracking the RDU will be OK, or is it JUST TRACK SPECIFIC TRACK ABUSE THAT WILL CAUSE THE SHUT- down?
 

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It turns off to regulate heat. As in. you can drive more than half an hour on a track if the heat buildup isnt great enough.

And Im totally expecting Ford Performance to release some form off addon cooling for the RDU
 

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My commute is about an hour, so if this is the case, there better be diff coolers offered. I'll be first in line
 

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So we all have heard that after about 30 minutes of track time the RDU may shut down and the car becomes a front drive, till it cools off.
"we all have," as in... you have?
please share the source. I have never heard mention of this till now.
and if it is a shutdown due to heat, i dont see how driving in winter couldn't help extend that period.
 

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This thread should be shut down in 30 minutes if the OP can't produce a source of this smoke...
Should read http://www.fordservicecontent.com/Ford_Content/vdirsnet/OwnerManual/Home/Content?bookCode=O32143&languageCode=en&marketCode=GB&viewTech=IE&chapterTitleSelected=G1795132&subTitleSelected=G1819502&topicHRef=G1819503&div=f because it says multiple times something similar to, "The system may automatically enter front-wheel drive only mode to protect driveline components.".
 

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Yeah, it can shut down after driving under "track" conditions. I highly doubt it will shut down on your normal commute unless you've just robbed a bank.
 

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Should read http://www.fordservicecontent.com/Ford_Content/vdirsnet/OwnerManual/Home/Content?bookCode=O32143&languageCode=en&marketCode=GB&viewTech=IE&chapterTitleSelected=G1795132&subTitleSelected=G1819502&topicHRef=G1819503&div=f because it says multiple times something similar to, "The system may automatically enter front-wheel drive only mode to protect driveline components.".

ok, so I just read that we shouldnt take the car in sand, it could overheat. got it
what about snow? didnt read anything about the RDU shutting down outside of sand use.
did I miss something?
 

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Why are people freaking out that the RDU will shut down during normal driving? TRACK time means you're beating hard on the car and traveling at high speeds so more heat will generate quicker. I highly doubt that will be a problem during normal driving.
 

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I think people are completely missing what OP is trying to ask/say.

First off, we have the article that the RDU may shutdown after 30 min of track use. So dont need to dispute that, its probably true.

OP is not talking about a normal 30 minute commute to work, duh that’s not going to be an issue. OP is wondering about a 30 minute drive in snow, IE there will be a ton of slipping from the RDU which would possibly generate more wear/heat compared to normal conditions.

That being said, I see what you're worried about. My vote is it shouldn’t be an issue, because with track use there will be much more traction (resistance) on the RDU and any slipping that occurs will have a pretty high threshold. Slipping in the snow would be a lot less stress on the RDU. That and add what I assume would be more aggressive torque vectoring on a track in track mode vs driving to work in the snow in normal mode where is probably not doing anything and I dont think you should have an issue.
 

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http://www.fordservicecontent.com/Ford_Content/vdirsnet/OwnerManual/Home/Content?bookCode=O32143&languageCode=en&marketCode=GB&viewTech=IE&chapterTitleSelected=G1688484&subTitleSelected=G1825249&topicHRef=G1825250&div=f

AWD OFF
Displays when the system has been automatically disabled to protect itself. This is caused by operating the vehicle with a severely mismatched tire installed, if the system is overheating or if there is an issue with another vehicle system preventing AWD operation. Overheating is most likely to occur if the vehicle is operated in severe conditions, for example track use, or if there is excessive wheel slip, for example your vehicle become stuck in mud.

The system resumes normal function and clears this message after:
● You switch the ignition off and on and drive a short distance with the correct wheels and tires installed.
● The system is allowed to cool.
● Other vehicle system issues are resolved.


I'm not sure if the 'severe conditions' could include situation like driving in snow. I would think it could if it gets stuck in snow as suggested in the last part of the sentence 'if there is excessive wheel slip'.
 

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The RDU shutdown is in no way "timed" to thirty minutes. 30 minutes of full-on hard track time was a benchmark goal of the engineering team. A goal they say they have met. The GKN Team was tasked with testing an AM RDU oil cooler. Here's a quote from the GKN Calibration Engineer: "I bought parts and tested an RDM oil cooler as a proof-of-concept. I know we provided the specs to Ford at their request. I don't know for certain what they are working on and plan to offer, but I know we've tested and proven what a cooler can do for the system."
Expect an AM RDU Oil Cooler option.

As regards the system shutting down from driving in snowy conditions...this seems highly unlikely. The ambient conditions alone would tend to lengthen that 30 min mark. That being said, some asshat out there will figure out a way to screw things up, "I got stuck in the mud and have been spinning the tires for forty minutes and I'm still stuck!"
 

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http://www.fordservicecontent.com/Ford_Content/vdirsnet/OwnerManual/Home/Content?bookCode=O32143&languageCode=en&marketCode=GB&viewTech=IE&chapterTitleSelected=G1688484&subTitleSelected=G1825249&topicHRef=G1825250&div=f

AWD OFF
Displays when the system has been automatically disabled to protect itself. This is caused by operating the vehicle with a severely mismatched tire installed, if the system is overheating or if there is an issue with another vehicle system preventing AWD operation. Overheating is most likely to occur if the vehicle is operated in severe conditions, for example track use, or if there is excessive wheel slip, for example your vehicle become stuck in mud.

The system resumes normal function and clears this message after:
● You switch the ignition off and on and drive a short distance with the correct wheels and tires installed.
● The system is allowed to cool.
● Other vehicle system issues are resolved.


I'm not sure if the 'severe conditions' could include situation like driving in snow. I would think it could if it gets stuck in snow as suggested in the last part of the sentence 'if there is excessive wheel slip'.
Wow! Although I understand that this is a built-in safety feature to help protect a very expensive and complex rear differential/components, but what good is AWD if it shuts off when I get stuck in snow or mud?! That is more that just a little unnerving to me personally. I can't see many other instances where you'd need the AWD system more...

Then again, the way this car is built and designed (on the beefy side), it will need to be proven under what conditions when this 'AWD OFF' actually occurs in real world use. I'm imagining a rainy track day, 6+ laps in and having an off into some mud, or something of the sort. Just wait 20 minutes for it to cool off and all is well again.

I'm sure Ford realizes that the AWD shutting off while climbing icy hills could actually kill someone... I hope :eek:
 

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Why are people freaking out that the RDU will shut down during normal driving? TRACK time means you're beating hard on the car and traveling at high speeds so more heat will generate quicker. I highly doubt that will be a problem during normal driving.
+1. Let's not start to freak out here, ppl.
 

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The st when equiped with snow tires is really really good in the snow, so I would assume that in the rs you'd have to be in drift mode doing donuts for a good half hour and/or traveling at some serious speeds for a long time. Deep snow will eventually overheat the rear but not to worry the fronts will still get you home
 

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Yeah everyone should just relax. Would you rather there be no system safety measures and have the clutch packs weld together? It's there for a good reason. If it can handle 30 mins non-stop going flat out on a track, a snow filled commute home isn't going to overheat it. Just don't treat it like a jeep and go off-roading. Besides, the GKN Twinster RDU is used in the Range Rover Evoque and it handles snow just fine. The RS's torque vectoring version of the Twinster is a much beefier version than the Evoque's so everyone needs to take a deep breath, trust it will work just fine, and enjoy it.
 
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