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Ok, I see where you are coming from and am going to be honest with my response. If you are worried about the $300-$500 track day fee and $1,000 prep then you probably shouldn't be looking at an RS. VIR is a phenomenal track, even the left hand kink headed down the hill before the site the oak tree was...I went off there a few times, and their is no reason that you should not start with a track day at VIR. Just be smart with you $$ and don't overstretch. I see 10 year old WRX's and Miatas passing AMG Mercs because the Merc owner is so timid on track because he/she knows they overspent and is too worried about messing up their car OR they didnt have the money to prep it at all and its overheating/brakes on fire/ tires melting etc.

P.S. The Miatas and WRXs are all like $5k off of craigslist with $1k in parts...an RS is like having 6ish of those - just make sure that's worth it to you and you checking account.
You shouldn't need much for the car. Pads and fluid. The right pads and fluid can last multiple events without an issue. So say, 500 in pads, 30 in fluid and some time to do that. Very little else will be needed, especially at first. If you can use those pads and fluid for say 3 track days (the rears will likely last for 15 or more) at 300/event that's really only about $500 per event and that's ignoring that the rear pads last longer.

Track days, as everything else in life, are all about risk management. There's always a risk and you have to decide what level of risk you will accept. If it's not writing off the car than you get HPDE insurance. If you can't afford that and can't risk writing off the car, you track something else - or nothing. Or you take that risk. It's a low % chance that you'll get bitten but if it does happen it will suck... and it's likely not just the car.. you'll be paying for damage to the track also which HPDE insurance also covers.
 

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Trying to get back on topic. Choosing tires is a difficult task without knowing the exact purpose to be optimized. Tires are bound by Federal Regulation. All street tires in the U.S must demonstrate they pass. This program UTQG, Uniform Tire Quality Grading, gives each tire a rating for treadwear, traction, and temperature generation/loss. These are federal ratings, done in a lab, are published, and are not proprietary. A 600 treadwear tire should last 3 times as long as 200 treadwear tire. A "AA" traction tire should produce more cornering force than a tire rated "A" or "B." Many of these values represent compromises between rubber hardness, sidewall stiffness, tread patterns for water removal etc. To see some of the subtleties I would suggest looking at Tirerack.com.

That being said, I ordered the Cup 2s. My car will be a nice day only summer driver and occasional autocross vehicle. The tires may "time out" before they "wear out."
 

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Trying to get back on topic. Choosing tires is a difficult task without knowing the exact purpose to be optimized. Tires are bound by Federal Regulation. All street tires in the U.S must demonstrate they pass. This program UTQG, Uniform Tire Quality Grading, gives each tire a rating for treadwear, traction, and temperature generation/loss. These are federal ratings, done in a lab, are published, and are not proprietary. A 600 treadwear tire should last 3 times as long as 200 treadwear tire. A "AA" traction tire should produce more cornering force than a tire rated "A" or "B." Many of these values represent compromises between rubber hardness, sidewall stiffness, tread patterns for water removal etc. To see some of the subtleties I would suggest looking at Tirerack.com.

That being said, I ordered the Cup 2s. My car will be a nice day only summer driver and occasional autocross vehicle. The tires may "time out" before they "wear out."
You might be interested in reading this...
Uniform Tire Quality Grading: The End of UTQG?
 

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So $500 for a single event is basically cray. Are there cheaper ways of playing with the car?

About the SC2 - they are "streetable" track tires, not road tires, so it's no surprise they don't have a high tread life rating. PSS are definitely the better choice for a DD, not to mention superior wet grip and lower chance of hydroplaning
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Well Auto-x is far cheaper and entry level as it gets. Not as fast as track days, but still a lot of fun with lower risk too.

I ordered with my Cup 2s, but I got winter tires ordered to and plan to replace the winter tires with all-seasons.
 

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Well Auto-x is far cheaper and entry level as it gets. Not as fast as track days, but still a lot of fun with lower risk too.

I ordered with my Cup 2s, but I got winter tires ordered to and plan to replace the winter tires with all-seasons.
If you don't mind me asking, why All Season+Summer instead of Winter+Summer?
 

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If you don't mind me asking, why All Season+Summer instead of Winter+Summer?
For some all seasons make more sense. I live in New England and honestly could use 3 sets of tires, summers, winters and all seasons. The temp change can be 30-40 degrees from one day to the next, especially in those end of winter months. We will get a 60 degree day only to wake up to light snow the next. The winters feel like your riding on Jello in those temps but you cant risk a dusting with summers as I'm sure you know. For people who may see the occasional snow fall with no chance of getting a foot or more, all seasons make sense, especially if it rarely stays below freezing for long.
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
If you don't mind me asking, why All Season+Summer instead of Winter+Summer?
Snow is very rare here this close to the coast in NC so true winter tires are not really needed. All-season will be on the car from fall to spring most likely with the Cup 2 only really being on the car in the summer or at an event that is warm enough. Even in summer though if my primary work car breaks down I'll put on the all-seasons while using the RS for work until the work car is fixed. I put 50-100 miles on the car while working a night.
 

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For some all seasons make more sense. I live in New England and honestly could use 3 sets of tires, summers, winters and all seasons. The temp change can be 30-40 degrees from one day to the next, especially in those end of winter months. We will get a 60 degree day only to wake up to light snow the next. The winters feel like your riding on Jello in those temps but you cant risk a dusting with summers as I'm sure you know. For people who may see the occasional snow fall with no chance of getting a foot or more, all seasons make sense, especially if it rarely stays below freezing for long.
Yep, or it'll be 30F at night, 55F during the day. I feel bad wearing my winters during most of the day, but in the morning the summers are frozen. BOO!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
So, "New" Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires just appeared on Tire Rack... The old ones have a thread width of 6.2", some N0 (Porsche) listing has 7.5" and the new ones have 8.4"!! Hope these new ones are the ones the RS is coming with.
 

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So, "New" Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires just appeared on Tire Rack... The old ones have a thread width of 6.2", some N0 (Porsche) listing has 7.5" and the new ones have 8.4"!! Hope these new ones are the ones the RS is coming with.
The old PSC2s are on closeout there, I checked that out yesterday.
 

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So, "New" Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires just appeared on Tire Rack... The old ones have a thread width of 6.2", some N0 (Porsche) listing has 7.5" and the new ones have 8.4"!! Hope these new ones are the ones the RS is coming with.
N tires are specific to Porsche. They are OE design, even though they are Cup2's they will differ from other Cup2's of the same size. The N number changes when the design of the tire changes, this is for the consumer to know which model they are purchasing so they don't mix designs. They may make updates throughout the development or as new models come out they keep improving the design and each time the tire will receive a new N number.
 

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Also on a note experience from the Vette world is that these tires can be hard to get at times. I think they make them on batches, not specifically the Cup2's but all the Sport models. I have had more then a few customers, that have had to wait a few weeks for tires due to backorder.
 
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