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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

This is my first post, besides my introduction post, and I'm finally doing research on the first modifications I want to do to my car after living with the mainly stock setup for over a year now. The only issue I have with the car after such a long time is the ride quality. It isn't bad over small distances and I've tried my hardest to get used to the ride on longer trips, but it still bothers me after a year of owning the car. After doing research for some months now I'm set on purchasing the DSC + Tractive setup. Since the car will be on the lift when doing the suspension, are there any bushings I should replace as well? How well is the life cycle of the OEM bushings? Are there any key areas that are known to wear or blow out bushings on this car? I've seen the Whiteline bushing kits as well as the individual bushings from Powerflex, but not much more.

My car is a 2016 SB RS purchased with only 3.5k miles in Nov of last year and I've put about 16k miles. I haven't driven the car hard until recently when I finally got more comfortable with the power and got a feel for what the can handle / how well it handles. The car was purchased stock, but has Eibach lowering springs and F / R Whiteline sway bars + end links (also has aftermarket hoses, etc. but that isn't important for this).

Since I've finally gotten comfortable with the car, I'm planning on taking it to the track. First track day will be 12/12/2020 at Thunderhill Raceway in NorCal, then will be taken to the various tracks around California when time permits (hoping for 3 - 5 track days a year). I have no idea what tracking the car will do to the suspension over time, so this is another factor I've been considering when doing my research on bushings. On a side note, are there any other things on the car I should look at while its on the lift? SS brake lines? Rotors? Pads?

I should note that I'm only 22 years old and have little experience modifying cars. My dad has run a body / repair shop for over 20 years so I've been able to help him repair and flip a few cars, but I've never done any modifications. I've had the car bug ever since I was a kid and have been waiting patiently / working hard for the time and finances to support this hobby and it has finally come. After finding good work in my field of study I've started to plan out what I want mods I want to do to this car, and since I feel the car is plenty fast for now, I want to start with brakes / suspension / chassis / handling stuff.

Excited to start building! Thank you for the help!
 

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As far as what to do next, I think your upcoming track experience should answer your questions as to whether you need brake upgrade. While I havent tracked mine, the usual areas to start your modding is suspension (which is already started) wheels/tires (usually down sizing to wider 18" rubber and wheels) and tune for improved power and throttle response. You may need to do some upgrades for cooling bc it can overheat and go into limp mode....your days should answer those questions.

Obviously more power (beyond just a tune) means other supporting upgrades so it can get $$$ so be cautious and plan your additions wisely.

In addition to suspension you may want to consider chassis bracing if you expect to spend alot of time at the track.

The stock clutch is ok, but upgrading may be needed. Motor and transmission mounts may also need upgrading for sustained track use.

Welcome to the modding journey...read alot and consult with other enthusiasts to gain information and remember that guidance from othrrs is hood but we all have preferances as to how we like our cars to feel, handle and drive.
 

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The stock bushings are fine and the car will be better than you for a while. Especially with the full Tractive setup. The Tractive setup is it's own animal and requires some tinkering to fine tune to your preference. Wait for DSC to come out with their Black Friday sale. It's their only sale for the year.

You might want to eventually go back to stock or put the sway bars to their lowest setting because of how the Tractive setup works. You won't gain much from stiff sway bars other than a rougher ride.

A tune and intercooler is a good start for mods. I know that you didn't ask about power mods, but Ford neutered the car with the stock tune and Transit intercooler (probably to not canibalize sales from the Mustang).

The brakes are fine for a while, but you're due a brake fluid flush. The brakes will feel much better with a proper fluid in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ah, I forgot to note the car came with CP-e motor mounts in all three locations as well as a mishimoto catch can and manga flow exhaust (which I dislike very much).

Thank you for the replies. Looks like I'll stay with OEM bushings for good amount of time while until I learn the car. I probably went to far down the rabbit hole while researching / considering where I should start my mods. Regarding wheel / tire fitments, it's my understanding that the Tractive setup will allow for wider tires due to the small diameter of the springs on the coil overs? I have been looking for a track specific set of tires as I don't want to wear / heat cycle my street tires so much, but I haven't had a chance to learn how different wheel specs affect the contact patches and performance of the car. Also, have there been considerable amounts of fitment issues setting up Tractive with Whiteline sway bars?

Power - wise I have this planned out as well, for the most part. I was thinking of Radium aux injection (hopefully controlled by Syvecs but I'm in California) but I can't decide if I want to spend the cash on the cleaner looking Mountune cast manifold + aux injection setup controlled by the syvecs or just run Radium/Stratified rails with a piggyback, Mountune radiator + oil cooler, CP-e IC + Pipes, CP-e Downpipe + Exhaust, and eventually built motor to handle sustained high power & track day use. This was my general idea as there are a considerable about of smaller supporting mods for all this as well as re - tunes for each step of the way - considering Stratified for this.

It looks as if in conjunction with everyones input I should just take it to a few track days and see how it reacts. My mind jumped to bushings because I thought that Ford probably isn't producing RS specific bushings so maybe I should consider getting stiffer, track focused bushings before I get out there. This logic was along the lines of swapping OEM brake fluid too high temp racing brake fluid to be able to handle the aggressive driving.

I've spent too long reading forum posts / questions, forum builds, researching the platform that I've overloaded myself with information and have even more questions now, on top of having little to none experience modding cars nor having any track experience and a personal driving style to modify my car into. Sounds like I have a lot of driving / tracking to do!
 

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I replaced all important bushings on my car. This was the first round of mods I made on the car, I think I started two-three weeks from new, basically after break-in when I started to drive it a little harder.

The most important ones are the inner bushings of the front track control arms. With these in stock form the geometry cannot be guaranteed and the wheels will move both on longitudinal acceleration (variable toe) and lateral load (variable camber).

For many, the solution is to install a camber plate and dial in extra camber but that only solves part of the problem.

#1 and #2 are essential, and perhaps do #3 (anti-roll bar) while you are at it, as the stock ones sticks to the bar so hard it does not rotates freely.

If you want to tackle the rear #12 is the most important as the stock ones are pretty soft, and #4 if you want to do the sway bar too.

They also make engine mount inserts which are the cheapest option to remove some flex in that area (#21, #25, #26).

Use theirs road version (yellow, purple) as the track versions (black) are very stiff and convey quite a bit of road noise into the cabin. They use polyurethane which lasts forever so it’s a one-time investment and only a marginal cost if you already replace the 4 dampers & springs.

The result of all this is a much more confidence-inspiring car with greatly improved steering feel and precision, including under heavy braking or cornering.

347035


The next mod after the bushings was a bespoke suspension set from Reiger Racing Suspensions.

347036
 

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I replaced all important bushings on my car. This was the first round of mods I made on the car, I think I started two-three weeks from new, basically after break-in when I started to drive it a little harder.

The most important ones are the inner bushings of the front track control arms. With these in stock form the geometry cannot be guaranteed and the wheels will move both on longitudinal acceleration (variable toe) and lateral load (variable camber).

For many, the solution is to install a camber plate and dial in extra camber but that only solves part of the problem.

#1 and #2 are essential, and perhaps do #3 (anti-roll bar) while you are at it, as the stock ones sticks to the bar so hard it does not rotates freely.

If you want to tackle the rear #12 is the most important as the stock ones are pretty soft, and #4 if you want to do the sway bar too.

They also make engine mount inserts which are the cheapest option to remove some flex in that area (#21, #25, #26).

Use theirs road version (yellow, purple) as the track versions (black) are very stiff and convey quite a bit of road noise into the cabin. They use polyurethane which lasts forever so it’s a one-time investment and only a marginal cost if you already replace the 4 dampers & springs.

The result of all this is a much more confidence-inspiring car with greatly improved steering feel and precision, including under heavy braking or cornering.

View attachment 347035

The next mod after the bushings was a bespoke suspension set from Reiger Racing Suspensions.

View attachment 347036
How was the NVH increase on swapping out the front LCA bushings? I might have a shop do those when I get my Tractive dampers rebuilt at 30k miles. I will likely grease the sway bar bushings when I'm under the car next.
 

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How was the NVH increase on swapping out the front LCA bushings? I might have a shop do those when I get my Tractive dampers rebuilt at 30k miles. I will likely grease the sway bar bushings when I'm under the car next.
Everyone has a different tolerance threshold but I used their BLK (track) series for the TCA/LCA on then RS and let’s say if you have noisy tires already, you will hear them loud and clear much more often.

You can hear every change of road surface very distinctly and with tires like the RE71R, tire noise may be the main noise you hear in the car while cruising on some pavements, while it’s close to normal on other pavements.

I know from experience with other cars that their Yellow/Purple road stuff offer most of the same handling benefits, but much less NVH increase. With these there is less difference than, say, the noise difference you may experience between tire brands, but still a marked effect on the car’s feeling. It’s one of the most satisfying mod for me, also considering the cost vs., say, a full suspension or an engine kit.

If you are the guy who would remove the A/C to save weight and engine drag then go for the BLK. It’s not like rose joints though, I still transport my kids to school in that car and it’s still bearable as a DD but probably twice as much road noise compared to stock.
 

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A word of caution on stiffening, as you make everything stiffer your tires will become more critical carrying more and more lateral load. You can get to a point where your tires can not handle the increased lateral loads and handling actually degrades.....especially at the limits.

Changing tires and suspension is going to make a huge difference in handling. Make one change at a time and learn about tge pluses and minuses of each change....you'll learn more and more about what works and what doesnt.
 

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Everyone has a different tolerance threshold but I used their BLK (track) series for the TCA/LCA on then RS and let’s say if you have noisy tires already, you will hear them loud and clear much more often.

You can hear every change of road surface very distinctly and with tires like the RE71R, tire noise may be the main noise you hear in the car while cruising on some pavements, while it’s close to normal on other pavements.

I know from experience with other cars that their Yellow/Purple road stuff offer most of the same handling benefits, but much less NVH increase. With these there is less difference than, say, the noise difference you may experience between tire brands, but still a marked effect on the car’s feeling. It’s one of the most satisfying mod for me, also considering the cost vs., say, a full suspension or an engine kit.

If you are the guy who would remove the A/C to save weight and engine drag then go for the BLK. It’s not like rose joints though, I still transport my kids to school in that car and it’s still bearable as a DD but probably twice as much road noise compared to stock.
Thanks for the post! Probably not for me as I'm still looking for ways to reduce NVH. I'm strongly considering pulling the inner fender wells to install sound deadening on the front, and already installed dynamat in the hatch area.

I also found another post about how these aren't a good fit for the Tractive setup so I might wait a bit or put the upgraded ones in when the OEM ones die.
 

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I think your forthcoming track experience should respond to your inquiries with respect to whether you need brake redesign. While I havent followed mine, the typical regions to begin your modding is suspension (which is now begun) wheels/tires (normally down estimating to more extensive 18" elastic and haggles) Kodi nox for improved force and choke reaction. You may need to do a few redesigns for cooling bc it can overheat and go into limp mode....your days should respond to those inquiries.

Clearly more force (past a tune) implies other supporting redesigns so it can get dollars so be wary and plan your augmentations admirably.

Notwithstanding suspension you might need to consider undercarriage supporting on the off chance that you hope to invest alot of energy at the track.

The stock grip is alright, yet overhauling might be required. Engine and transmission mounts may likewise require overhauling for supported track use.
 

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Something that I wish someone told me when I was young is to have a goal for the car before you get started. I started modding my first car without a plan and it ended horribly. I'll eventually fully restore that car but I will be undoing a bunch of the "because racecar" mods.

With the RS, I wanted something more comfortable than stock but with more consistent power. So, Tractive + M380 + induction + interior mods and I'm basically done. There might be a FP exhaust in my future, maybe if I can find one on sale. Beyond that, I'll tinker on the fringes with OEM+ type mods.

If you put a bunch of track parts on your street car, you will hate driving the thing except at the track. Girls will hate riding in it, unless your charm exceeds the uncomfortableness of the car.
 

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Something that I wish someone told me when I was young is to have a goal for the car before you get started. I started modding my first car without a plan and it ended horribly. I'll eventually fully restore that car but I will be undoing a bunch of the "because racecar" mods.

With the RS, I wanted something more comfortable than stock but with more consistent power. So, Tractive + M380 + induction + interior mods and I'm basically done. There might be a FP exhaust in my future, maybe if I can find one on sale. Beyond that, I'll tinker on the fringes with OEM+ type mods.

If you put a bunch of track parts on your street car, you will hate driving the thing except at the track. Girls will hate riding in it, unless your charm exceeds the uncomfortableness of the car.
The forum only allows one like, so....👍👍👍👍👍👍👍
Young guys, pay close attention to the girls part! I have found one female that likes the (stock) ride, much less track version, but I think she’s crazy anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you all for your responses!

There are two track events in December in California and I'm waiting to see SpeedSF's track day calendar for 2021. Very excited to get on the track and see where this goes!

I'll hold off on the "because racer" mods until I get a few days / weekends on the track to get a picture of where I think I want the car to go. Who knows, maybe my inexperience will play in my favor and I'll love the car as is for the time being. I've definitely read too much into modding on here from very experienced forum members and convinced myself I need to do the same, so I thank you all for the help you've given me.

However, the Tractive + DSC is going in no matter what as I just cannot get used to the OEM ride, will post when I purchase and install!
 

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My recommendation is to do the bare minimum. Look the car over and make sure everything is technically sound, and that your brakes/tires/consumables are in good shape. Swap to a high-temperature brake fluid, start with 35psi cold tire pressure, and do nothing else for your first few track outings. Learn to drive the car and enjoy it. It's super capable out of the box and very confidence-inspiring from behind the wheel.

From there, decide what you actually want from the car. There is no shortage of things you can do if you want to continue going faster and faster, but as a general trend things that help you on the track are going to introduce compromise on the street. I attend track days in my RS to have fun, and I'm not interested in going faster for faster's sake. I am happy to go faster by improving my driving and skill, but I'm not interested in re-doing my suspension, tuning my motor, adding aero, etc for quicker lap times. That's because my car is also my dependable daily. As my car stands I've added only a Schroth QuickFit harness (helps keep me planted in the stock seats) and track wheels/tires, mostly as a convenience so I'm not burning through my street tires. Stock suspension, powertrain, everything, and I love it. It punches way above its weight on track.

The only thing that does not seem to stand up to track use, and I hate to say it because I always end up saying it, is the brakes. I'm not sure if I'm a brake punisher but I put an incredible amount of heat into my system and boil my fluid every day I'm out there, no matter what I try with the stock hardware. That's why I suggest only upping your fluid as a starting point. You might find that you have a better or different experience.
 
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