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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several owners have installed lowering springs including H&R, Eibach and Mountune with drop heights of .6 to 1.2" inches. What are you finding for the front and rear camber after install? One owner claimed an additional -1 degree of front and rear camber with the Moutune springs.

My concern is that at some point the lowering may give excessive negative camber...especially in the rear. Does this mean that additional camber bolts or camber arms are needed to re-adjust the rear camber?
 

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Several owners have installed lowering springs including H&R, Eibach and Mountune with drop heights of .6 to 1.2" inches. What are you finding for the front and rear camber after install? One owner claimed an additional -1 degree of front and rear camber with the Moutune springs.

My concern is that at some point the lowering may give excessive negative camber...especially in the rear. Does this mean that additional camber bolts or camber arms are needed to re-adjust the rear camber?
It seems to me that it would be fairly straightforward to work out the camber gain as a function of suspension travel, since that only depends on the pickup points and link lengths. I would expect that the various so-called tuner firms have done that and THEY know what you will get, but I'm surprised that nobody on the forum here is talking about having done the math to figure out where things get stupid from a handling perspective.
 

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I'm running -3 deg front and rear (intentionally) on ST coilovers using camber plates in front and Massive camber arms in the rear. Although excessive camber will wear the inside of the tire a bit more quickly, abnormal toe is the real tire killer. Make sure you get an alignment done after lowering your car. Your tires (and wallet) will thank you.

Since there is ZERO way to adjust camber front or rear on the factory suspension, if you want to correct your camber after lowering, you will need aftermarket parts: front camber plates, rear camber arms, possibly control arms for toe in the rear, as there isn't much rear toe adjustment available using the stock eccentric bolts.
 

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Several owners have installed lowering springs including H&R, Eibach and Mountune with drop heights of .6 to 1.2" inches. What are you finding for the front and rear camber after install? One owner claimed an additional -1 degree of front and rear camber with the Moutune springs.

My concern is that at some point the lowering may give excessive negative camber...especially in the rear. Does this mean that additional camber bolts or camber arms are needed to re-adjust the rear camber?
Static camber may in fact increase with the drop in front, but you won't get any camber gain like you get from camber plates or longer control arms, so under the compression it will act just like the longer spring. You will lower center of gravity and probably make the car stiffer, but you'll get less suspension travel and worsen it's behaviour on wet. It will not be a big deal. What really matters is not the static camber, but camber angle at extreme load during cornering, the more vertical the wheel will be at that moment, the more grip and speed you get. Playing with just one element of the suspension design almost never works. If you lower the rear a bit more you will reduce the rake. The rake is there for the turn in feel and the shocks are designed to work with rake, so you will loose some of the turn in ability. I had ones Eibach short springs on the Porsche 997.2 c4s, the car looked awesome and felt tighter when driven relatively slowly, but on the track she was slower and the turn in was bad, knowing that Porsche is no master in that matter. It might be different in the RS, but I very much doubt that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
With the RS running front McPhearson struts and wishbone rear suspension they act totally different when being lowered or compressed. On the RS with the front suspension at normal ride height the negstive camber will actually increase (more negative) for a short distance as the tire moves upward and the axle becomes parallel with the ground. After that point the it starts losing negative camber. On a lowered car, as the axle exceeds the point of being parallel to the ground at static height the camber will decreases as the suspension compresses. This is all normal for McPheason struts but a lowered car will feel much better at moderate cornering speeds but not as good at the limits. With a modest drop, say of 1/2", it should not create I'll handling, especially if stiffer swaybars are added to resist roll (deflection) at the limits.

Lowering the rear wishbone suspension increases negative camber as the suspension moves upward..which is generally good for cornering. The potential challenge is that with lowering the static gain can become excessive. Since the RS has no dedicated adjustment for camber it is possible that after lowering rear camber can exceed -1.5 or even -2 deg depending on the amount of lowering. The result having excessive rear negative camber is that it actually worsens the handling, creating push. Ideally rear camber should be under -1 deg, and less if you are an aggressive driver.

My initial question is an effort to gather info on how much the camber is affected (front and rear) in order to assess what, if any changes are required to actually improve the handling while lowering the car.
 
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