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Discussion Starter #1
The past few days, all I've been reading is referring to an RS as 'a RS'. I'm pretty sure it's 'an RS'.


What car do you have? I have an RS.

vs

What car do you have? I have a RS.

Which is more correct?
 

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The rule I always learned growing up was words that start with a vowel get 'an', otherwise it's 'a'. Based on that, I think it's "a RS".

What I've come to prefer is words that start with a vowel sound get 'an', otherwise it's 'a'. In my opinion, it's "an RS".
 

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The past few days, all I've been reading is referring to an RS as 'a RS'. I'm pretty sure it's 'an RS'.


What car do you have? I have an RS.

vs

What car do you have? I have a RS.

Which is more correct?

From a grammarian perspective the correct answer is "a RS".

Many people adhere to a belief that you use the article “a” before words that begin with consonants and “an” before words that begin with vowels. But that isn’t the rule, and it’s important to avoid this rookie mistake before turning over your manuscript to agents and editors.

The real rule is this: You use the article “a” before words that start with a consonant sound and “an” before words that start with a vowel sound. For example, He has a unique point of view on the subject and talked about it for an hour. The “u” in “unique” makes the “Y” sound—a consonant sound—therefore you use “a” as your article, while the “h” in “hour” sounds like it starts with “ow”—a vowel sound.

source: http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/a-before-consonants-and-an-before-vowels-is-not-the-rule



The Rule

The rule states that “a” should be used before words that begin with consonants (e.g., b, c ,d) while “an” should be used before words that begin with vowels (e.g., a,e,i). Notice, however, that the usage is determined by the pronunciation and not by the spelling, as many people wrongly assume.

source: Using ?a? and ?an? Before Words




Peace, Rock On, Words Up, YMMV,

MidCow3



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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
The rule I always learned growing up was words that start with a vowel get 'an', otherwise it's 'a'. Based on that, I think it's "a RS".

What I've come to prefer is words that start with a vowel sound get 'an', otherwise it's 'a'. In my opinion, it's "an RS".
..correct! on both accounts:


We were all taught that a precedes a word starting with a consonant and that an precedes a word starting with a vowel (a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y).

Here’s the secret to making the rule work: The rule applies to the sound of the letter beginning the word, not just the letter itself. The way we say the word will determine whether or not we use a or an. If the word begins with a vowel sound, you must use an. If it begins with a consonant sound, you must use a.


Therefor the correct term is 'an RS'. This is because the letter R at the beginning has an A sounds which is a vowel and 'an' is correctly used before RS.

Got it kids!?
 

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It's just a Ford.
 

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I have always said "The RS " for the MK1 clone.
I hope I can say the new one is my "Bat Crazy RS "
 

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Is class dismissed....I think I heard the bell!
 

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From a grammarian perspective the correct answer is "a RS".

Many people adhere to a belief that you use the article “a” before words that begin with consonants and “an” before words that begin with vowels. But that isn’t the rule, and it’s important to avoid this rookie mistake before turning over your manuscript to agents and editors.

The real rule is this: You use the article “a” before words that start with a consonant sound and “an” before words that start with a vowel sound. For example, He has a unique point of view on the subject and talked about it for an hour. The “u” in “unique” makes the “Y” sound—a consonant sound—therefore you use “a” as your article, while the “h” in “hour” sounds like it starts with “ow”—a vowel sound.

source: The Rule is Not "A" Before Consonants and "An" Before Vowels



The Rule

The rule states that “a” should be used before words that begin with consonants (e.g., b, c ,d) while “an” should be used before words that begin with vowels (e.g., a,e,i). Notice, however, that the usage is determined by the pronunciation and not by the spelling, as many people wrongly assume.

source: Using ?a? and ?an? Before Words




Peace, Rock On, Words Up, YMMV,

MidCow3
It's 'an RS'.

Abbreviation verbalised

By this rule, if the abbreviation starts with a vowel-sounding letter, the article used is "an"; if it starts with a consonant-sounding letter, it takes an "a". This would give "an NHS hospital" and "a BBC documentary".

vowel-sounding letters (take "an"):A E F H I L M N O R S X

consonant-sounding letters (take "a"):B C D G J K P Q T U V W Y*
 

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The rule I always learned growing up was words that start with a vowel get 'an', otherwise it's 'a'. Based on that, I think it's "a RS".

What I've come to prefer is words that start with a vowel sound get 'an', otherwise it's 'a'. In my opinion, it's "an RS".
By your logic it should be an. It's "an are ess" 😀
 

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Dat dur RS.
 
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