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Hope it's Painted, Unpainted the winter road salt will destroy it in a season.
The mesh screen is there for protection. And isn't the intercooler aluminum? Road salt won't corrode it. If anything gets past the mesh, the paint would chip over time too. Unpainted might look better in the long run.
 

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^ Are you kidding me? you live in Canada and haven't seen pitting on aluminum due to salt? If left untreated salt will pit and corrode the part. That "shiny silver inter cooler" will be chalky white after a Canadian Winter.
 

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^ Are you kidding me? you live in Canada and haven't seen pitting on aluminum due to salt? If left untreated salt will pit and corrode the part. That "shiny silver inter cooler" will be chalky white after a Canadian Winter.
No I haven't... At least not On my car. I haven't seen any problematic issues with my radiator or my top mount intercooler (yes it's top mount but still gets loads of salt spray coming in) and that's after a decade of driving in salt in my WRX. I also had a decent sized pint chip on my aluminum hood that I didn't catch until spring and there was no pitting.
 

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^ Are you kidding me? you live in Canada and haven't seen pitting on aluminum due to salt? If left untreated salt will pit and corrode the part. That "shiny silver inter cooler" will be chalky white after a Canadian Winter.
Not necessarily Mike. Aluminum is very resistant to salt corrosion. If you see a "chalky white" substance on an aluminum part, it's likely due to galvanic corrosion. You are correct that galvanic corrosion is much more likely in the presence of chloride and water, but this normally is taken into consideration by the engineers who isolate the electron flow with the use of insulating materials. (Like the rubber grommets that insulate the IC fasteners).
 

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Aluminum is very resistant to salt corrosion. If you see a "chalky white" substance on an aluminum part, it's likely due to galvanic corrosion.
This is my understanding. Aluminum is incredibly corrosion resistant. I believe what you are referring to Mike is salt oxidation on the surface of aluminum, which happens mainly in parts and wheels that are cast in aluminum.

To give some insight on what @RocketRS is talking about, here is that same logic, applied to aluminum boats in salt water:

"We’re talking about galvanic corrosion. Back in science class you’d say that this is where one metal in an electrically conductive solution (such as salt water) gives up atoms when connected to a dissimilar metal in that same solution. Losing atoms means that the metal is falling apart, or corroding. In the slip aboard your boat, you’d say that this is where your aluminum hull becomes pitted because of a bronze through-hull on a neighboring boat.

The rate of corrosion of a metal on its own is determined by how chemically active it becomes when put in salt water. The more active, the more susceptible it is to corrosion. The less active, the more resistant it is to corrosion. When not in contact with anything else, most marine metals such as aluminum, bronze and stainless steel will corrode away at a reasonably slow rate. No danger there. But connect different metals, one active (aluminum) and the other a lot less active (i.e., a copper penny), in water and atoms will start to flow. And the aluminum will start to fall apart.

Fiesta, a Florida pontoon builder that bills its boats as “built for use in salt water,” isolates hardware and stainless-steel bolts from the aluminum with nylon washers. Hull compartments have drains with silicone-sealed nylon plugs that can be opened to drain accumulated moisture. They also employ dedicated mounting brackets for sacrificial anodes, and their hulls and extrusions are made from thicker metal."
 

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Looks like it needs an upgrade
 

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With modern bonding materials and rigid mounting, like something structural bounding each endcap, I wouldn't have any concerns. Looks like a lot of thought and CAD work went into those endcaps.

Jim
 

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With modern bonding materials and rigid mounting, like something structural bounding each endcap, I wouldn't have any concerns. Looks like a lot of thought and CAD work went into those endcaps.

Jim
I agree. You wont find a cooler that weighs less or offers as low of a pressure drop.
 

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All I know is that on the ST an I/C is a must. I'm hoping the RS will be able to maintain ambient intake temp after a few good pulls and doesn't start running 10-20 degrees over ambient when cruising around town like the ST did.

I think the biggest problem with the ST was the grill shutters though, after ripping those out and seeing how much surface area they block I couldn't believe it. A 100 degree rise after one pull started to make sense after seeing that lol.
 

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My question is whether it will be big enough...The one on the ST was pretty useless (especially in so-cal). If they are claiming 30 min track time then fingers crossed its plenty large enough....:p
 

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A little while back I did a comparison between the OEM FoST IC and the OEM FoRS IC.

I posted photos somewhere here in the forum shows that the FoRS IC has two extra rows of fins (taller) and it's a half inch thicker than the FoST IC.

This may help a bit with heat soak but I'll still be looking for a upgraded IC given the current construction.
 
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