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Can someone do a tutorial on how to change the front and rear brakes? I've only ever changed them on an e92 m3. How many bolts are on the front calipers? What size tool do I need to loosen them? Do the rears require a special tool to retract the piston like on the st? Does the parking brake have to be off to do the rears?
 

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Can someone do a tutorial on how to change the front and rear brakes? I've only ever changed them on an e92 m3. How many bolts are on the front calipers? What size tool do I need to loosen them? Do the rears require a special tool to retract the piston like on the st? Does the parking brake have to be off to do the rears?
Fronts are easy. 13mm or 1/2" IIRC, then get the pins out. I damaged the powder coating on mine very easily though. They make tools to deal with the pins and prevent said damage. I don't have the tool so I just used a punch where I could and mallet otherwise.

I use a.. some brand that starts with an L brake caliper compression tool up front as well. Makes it easy. going to search amazon now....

This one: https://www.amazon.com/Lang-Tools-279-Brake-Caliper/dp/B0079GQKDE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1486354006&sr=8-1

The rears blow. They are the kind you spin in (I just use needle nose pliers) but they don't like to go in at all. I turned the damn things for 20-30 minutes and the first one I tried didn't go back in far enough to put new pads in. I didn't bother trying the other side yet. @Bossing said you can turn it half a turn or so, wait 10 seconds, turn again, wait again, turn, wait, etc and they'll go back in. I had already given up so I haven't tried that. Out of the many many calipers I've worked on like these, they are the worse. Total ****.
 

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^Yup.... the rears are a pain because they take so dang long! You'll have to push in with a large C-clamp in increments.

Turn it in... then it'll stop after a few turns... loosen the clamp and wait like 10-15 secs to let the piston pressure subside... and then repeat again and again. Like a dozen times or more!

Use a microfiber in between so that you don't scratch up the blue finish. And definitely an exercise of time & patience... ugh.

 

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Could you open the bleeder valve to speed it up? Also how worn were the rears in comparison to the fronts (if you did both at the same time)?
 

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Could you open the bleeder valve to speed it up? Also how worn were the rears in comparison to the fronts (if you did both at the same time)?

Should do, I also use one of these just so you can apply pressure & turn at the same time

VS039-V2.jpg
 

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so 13mm hex to loosen front and back pins holding the caliper on the caliper housing?
The 13mm is for the front bridge bolt. The other two pins get pushed out and are only secured by a spring fastener on each pin (you'll see what I mean when you do it). The hardest part of the fronts is pushing the pistons in, unless you use that tool I posted above, then it's using a drift to get the two pings in and out. It's really a simple pad swap up front.

The rears are 7mm hex. You won't get a socket and tool on the bottom bolt in the rear (sway bar is in the way) so have a normal 7mm allen key for that one. Maybe you could modify one enough to work or get a real short version, but it's not really worth it. Once you remove the two 7mm hex bolts (which are combination bolts and sliders) you can remove the caliper. Oh, there's a spring clip to pop off in the back also. it's nothing weird, just pop it off. To give myself more room, I also pulled the e-brake cable off the bracket on the caliper. It's easy to do, but probably not needed.

I really f'ing hate the rear calipers on these. Cheapest bidder without a doubt. I don't care that they are sliders, I just want **** to work like it should and the fact that it's a PITA to get the pistons back in annoys me.

edit: added more info for the rear.
 

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BTW, if you want to wait I can do a DIY with pics this weekend. I might even consider trying the rears again. I like being miserable.
 

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Those tools are pretty pricey, minus the cube socket adapter. That lever piston spreader looks like it works.
 

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Yes plz. Sign me the f**k up for a tutorial with pics!
Once my beer is cold I'll go change them. It's 82 degrees out today, need the refreshment.
 

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Broken into two posts.....

OK, uploaded the pics so here goes. If anyone has the torque specs for the related brake bolts let me know and I'll update, I just make that kind of stuff "tight enough".

Disclaimer: I'm not an expert. Don't blame me if things go wrong. Always follow normal safety procedures when working on your car. I didn't use jackstands because I wasn't going to put any part of my body under the car, please use jackstands when you work on your car.

First, setup your work area, get your beverage of choice ready, etc:


I also always use wheel chocks for the wheels that will be in contact with the ground:


We will start with the front pads.

Tools required/useful for the fronts: Hammer, torque wrench, 3/8" 13mm deep socket, 3/8" ratchet, 1/2" drive ratchet for the lug nuts, socket for lug nuts will vary, IIRC stock is 21mm? Mine are 19mm. Angled needle nose pliers can be helpful, a drift/punch, a small drift (or an RC car wrench like I use), caliper spreader is very useful, shop towels/paper towels, adult beverages never hurt.

Pic of said tools:


Remove or loosen the brake res cap. Put shop towels/paper towels around it in case fluid spills. If you've refilled the res with well used pads you will most likely have to remove some fluid before you finish both front calipers:


Start by lifting the car off the ground. To protect the pinch weld, you can use a hockey puck or similar on the jack:


Take off the wheel, and you'll see this:


On the back of the front caliper will be a 13mm bolt, seen here:


Loosen this bolt but do not remove it all the way. Leave the socket on it and use a hammer to start pushing the bridge bolt through the caliper:


It should come out a bit, about this far:


Next, take the 13mm bolt out of the bridge bolt completely. You should be able to press down on the pad spring to remove the bridge bolt:


If you can't get it to move that way, you can use angled needle nose pliers to help get it moving - be careful, you can easily damage the powder coat on the calipers:


Next, use a drift/punch to push out the caliper pins. Start with the top, then the bottom. You can remove the spring after just one or just leave it in until you push out both pins:


All front hardware removed:


Now you can pull the pads out. Start with the outside pad. The inside will easily come out then. You can make this easier by pulling on the outside pad with your hands to compress the pistons a little (use both hands, impossible to do so and take a pic but you get the point):


If you look inside the empty caliper, you should see this:


Now, using whatever method you prefer but preferably with a real tool, compress the pistons back into the caliper body:


Installation is basically the reverse, but..

The pins are basically held in with a spring that gets compressed when hammered back into the caliper, it looks like this:


Start with the lower pin, make sure that it goes through both pads!


Use a drift or other tool (like this handy RC car wrench) to let you hammer this back in without damaging the finish on the calipers:


Once you are finished with the first pin, it should look like this:


Orientation of the anti-rattle spring:
 

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Part 2:
To install the anti-rattle spring, start with it in a position similar to this:


Then rotate it flat and up at the same time to get here:


And then install the top pin, making sure that it goes through both caliper holes and the spring:


It should look like this now:


Install the bridge and 13mm bolt, compress the spring with your fingers to get it mounted.


The bridge will only fit one way (flat sides of the head will be horizontal). I didn't take a pic, but it's obvious. It was NOT rotated correctly in the pic above since I was focused on the pic not the install.

Verify that everything looks right (both pins in, bridge bolt is tight, anti-rattle spring is installed in the correct position, etc).

Wheel torque spec is 100ft/lbs. I'm sure the bridge bolt has one but I don't have it, just make it snug. It doesn't need a lot of torque on it.


Now for the rear brakes.

Tools required/useful for the rears: Torque wrench, 7mm allen key, optional 3/8" 7mm allen socket and ratchet, 1/2" drive ratchet for the lug nuts, socket for lug nuts will vary, IIRC stock is 21mm? Mine are 19mm. Flat head screwdriver, straight and angled needle nose pliers, brake caliper tool can be helpful, c-clamp to compress piston bit by bit in between turns of the piston, shop towels/paper towels (same reason as fronts, to protect against fluid spills from the brake fluid res), adult beverages never hurt.

Pic of most of the tools:


Jack up the car, take off the wheel, etc.

Should see this:


Pop off the spring:


Pop off the slider bolt caps:


Optional - I find it easier to deal with but this is NOT required as @Bossing does his with the cable installed.

If you want to, it's easy with a needle nose plier and your fingers:



Back to the required stuff..

For the top slider bolt, use the 7mm allen key or the 7mm allen key socket:


Use the 7mm allen key for the bottom. If for some reason it's hard to get off, or just to be lazy, you can use a box end wrench to give you more leverage:


Rear hardware removed:


To compress the piston, you SHOULD be able to just turn it in with the brake caliper tool, needle nose pliers, etc. @Bossing uses a c-clamp to compress his, probably with turns in betwen but maybe not. I haven't changed mine since rotating them doesn't seem to work well by itself so you'll have to figure this detail out:


To reinstall, the pad with the spring goes on the inside of the car:


Next install the sliding pins/bolts again and tighen - unsure of spec but again, make them tight but they don't need an insane amount of torque or anything especially when you consider that they are allen head bolts.

Orientation of the spring:


It's easy to install, start with one hole and then get the other in:



Spring installed:


And if you took off the e-brake cable, don't forget to reinstall:


Torque wheel, etc.
 

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And yes.. I need to remove the rubber marks all over the front...
 

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@Dave-ROR for the front pads did you find they were stuck to the pistons? I can get the pads pushed back from the rotors but they will not budge off the pistons, suggestions?
Stock ones are a little because of the anti-noise grease Ford used. For the outside pad, use a extension, narrow deep socket, etc agaist the pad itself (place whatever tool on the hub side) and hit it with a hammer (not that hard, it won't take much). It'll come out. The inside you just need to work out but once you have more space to do so it's not that bad.
 

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For compressing the pistons in the front with the tool, does it only compress the two opposing pistons at one time? Or is it all four at the same time?
 

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For compressing the pistons in the front with the tool, does it only compress the two opposing pistons at one time? Or is it all four at the same time?
Two at a time unless you want to remove the caliper from the knuckle.
 
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