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Product Auto part Spark plug Fastener Automotive engine part

If you're planning on changing your spark plugs, or just want to learn about how they work, watch this video.

BY BRIAN SILVESTRO, JUN 22, 2018

Want to learn how to change spark plugs yourself? This video, put together by DIY YouTuber ChirsFix, is a definitive guide to the entire process.

Not only does ChrisFix cover how to remove and replace spark plugs, he also talks you through what kinds of plugs work best for your car, how to measure and correct spark plug gap, and how to see whether a spark plug actually needs replacing. He also gives some pointers on how to repair and replace spark plug coils and wires. Basically, anything that has to do with spark plugs, this video covers.

And if you're not sure how spark plugs work, ChrisFix also gives a quick explainer walking you through the combustion cycle, and the plug's ever-important role in making sure your engine works as it should.

So if you're planning on changing your spark plugs, or just want to learn more about how they function, this video is definitely worth the watch. Check it out below.


https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/buying-maintenance/a21778298/how-to-change-spark-plugs/
 
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I think spark plugs are the most misunderstood component on cars. I get the impression that some think a big increase in hp is gained by going hotter, colder, more electrodes... leave them alone unless you’ve stripped the threads or blown one out of the head!
 

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I've been running into a lot of issues while fooling with spark plugs. It seems like may have been the reason the cylinder was pulling timing. But I've just gone through 3 sets...
 

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Thats a pretty decent video in fact. A rare thing these days, a youtube how too thats technically good.

Ciao
 

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Thread revival. I have a question re the torque to use on the spark plugs. Which is correct:
  1. I believe the Ford Workshop Manual where it specifies 12Nm (9 lb. ft.) - see attached. But this feels low - when I installed plugs the torque wrench barely moved from hand tight to first click.
    341323
  2. The NGK site has a table showing a range of 7.2 to 14.5 lb.ft.
  3. The video above states 20Nm (15 lb. ft.).
  4. I am currently in a debate with a Slow Ford (YouTube) who insists 9 lb. ft. is way too low and has generic references stating 20-30 Nm (14 to 22 lb. ft) plus 90 degrees!
  5. I actually set mine to 10 lb. ft. due to 'feel' i.e. 9 lb. ft. was hand tight. I used an out-of-the-box new i.e. freshly calibrated torque wrench (Kincrome 3/8" rated at +/-4% in 5-80 lb. ft. range). I then checked with my calibrated wrist :) and the plugs were definitely 'snug'.
 

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I installed Denso ITV22 spark plugs with my W400 kit from Tune+. Denso recommends either using the torque method or tightening angle method for installing spark plugs.
See the torque/angle chart here. ITV22 = 1/16 turn past snug.
See the spark plug size chart here. ITV22 = 14 mm diameter.

After dabbing on some anti-seize, I threaded each of the (4) ITV22 spark plugs into my RS cylinder head. Once snug, I went 1/16 turn per the chart.

In the past I've tried torquing spark plugs down just like I do all other vehicle fasteners. However, I snapped a spark plug off in my '95 Eclipse GSX head. Took an easy out and shop vac to fix. After that day I swore I would only use the tightening angle method. I've never had a spark plug back out.
 

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I recently bought pre-gapped NGK plugs from Tune+. Does anyone know what spec these are gapped to? I'm assuming .026, but I can't find the info on their site and I wanted to just double check to make sure they are correct.
 

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Thread revival. I have a question re the torque to use on the spark plugs. Which is correct:
  1. I believe the Ford Workshop Manual where it specifies 12Nm (9 lb. ft.) - see attached. But this feels low - when I installed plugs the torque wrench barely moved from hand tight to first click. View attachment 341323
  2. The NGK site has a table showing a range of 7.2 to 14.5 lb.ft.
  3. The video above states 20Nm (15 lb. ft.).
  4. I am currently in a debate with a Slow Ford (YouTube) who insists 9 lb. ft. is way too low and has generic references stating 20-30 Nm (14 to 22 lb. ft) plus 90 degrees!
  5. I actually set mine to 10 lb. ft. due to 'feel' i.e. 9 lb. ft. was hand tight. I used an out-of-the-box new i.e. freshly calibrated torque wrench (Kincrome 3/8" rated at +/-4% in 5-80 lb. ft. range). I then checked with my calibrated wrist :) and the plugs were definitely 'snug'.
Just as a piece of general information regarding plug installation. Remember they will "feel" different on install due to a number of factors like plug thread diameter, anti seize use or not, is it a new plug or refit, how clean are the threads on the plug and in the head and the method of sealing. The RS uses a taper seal plug and others use a crush washer. They both "feel" very different on installation. Personally I'd use the plug manufacturers specs if I torqued plugs which I dont (exception being aircraft plugs because I'm required to by law) because they have the technical knowledge on their particular plugs. Fords specs are aligned to whoever makes their plugs and the applied torque on the plug is more critical than on the threads in the head. Unless the threads in the head are damaged or the plugs have been in and out a gazzillion times the overwhelming majority of the time the plug is the weak link.
The 22 ft/lbs plus 90 deg is a some sort of translation error or mistake.
Here's an image of some plugs I have from years past. Inherited from my Grandfather who was also an Aircraft Engineer The first 3 from the left are aircraft plugs. The 4th plug, the pink automotive Lodge has a knurled 3mm thick nut to hold the ignition lead which I presume had a simple round lug on it. It's quite old I would imagine.The others are automotive as well probably from the 50's and 60's.

Ciao
342691
 

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Personally I'd use the plug manufacturers specs if I torqued plugs which I dont (exception being aircraft plugs because I'm required to by law) because they have the technical knowledge on their particular plugs. Fords specs are aligned to whoever makes their plugs and the applied torque on the plug is more critical than on the threads in the head.
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Thanks Phil. The OEM plugs that came out of my car have a Ford part number, but stamped on the shell is ILTR6G8G which is an NGK part number; obviously Ford use NGK plugs. Hence, I think you'd advise the torque range of 7.2 to 14.5 lb.ft. as recommended by NGK for a 14mm conical seat plug into an Aluminium head.
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