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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have bought a set of replacement LEDs from SuperBrightLEDs as suggested in this thread: http://www.focusrs.org/forum/32-focus-rs-lighting/55385-led-bulbs-budget.html. Since my RS hyperflashes with these bulbs installed, I also bought a load resistor kit. However, it looks like I would need to tap into the wiring harness that connects to the headlight since none of the wiring is exposed on the outside of the headlight (unlike the tail lights). All the wiring for each bulb socket are on the inside of the headlight housing and it does not appear to be feasible to install the load resistors inside the headlights without disassembling the headlight.



Has anyone been able to track down the wiring diagram for the headlight? Also, does anyone happen to know what kind of connector is used for the headlights? Another idea I’m considering is that if I can buy the connectors, I can make an extension of the harness that has the load resistors tapped to avoid modifying the factory wiring harness entirely.

 

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Why don't you add the resistor to the tail lamps? It doesn't matter where it is located as long as total resistance is enough to slow the flashing. I think the relay can be replaced with one that is meant for LED's making the whole job easier. But I haven't personally looked any up.

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Sorry if I am clueless but is that how it really works? That would mean all of the turn signal bulbs for a side are in series?Then one failed bulb kills the entire side front and rear? That does not sound right? I am curious because I have the resistors wired into my rear signals but also could not see my way to doing it again for the much trickier front solution.
Why don't you add the resistor to the tail lamps? It doesn't matter where it is located as long as total resistance is enough to slow the flashing. I think the relay can be replaced with one that is meant for LED's making the whole job easier. But I haven't personally looked any up.

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Why don't you add the resistor to the tail lamps? It doesn't matter where it is located as long as total resistance is enough to slow the flashing. I think the relay can be replaced with one that is meant for LED's making the whole job easier. But I haven't personally looked any up.
I already have resistors installed for my tail lights since I have already installed LED replacements for the tail light turn signals. Those resistors are only sufficient to prevent hyperblinking for the tail light turn signals and a second set of resistors are needed for the front turn signals.
 

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Why don't you add the resistor to the tail lamps? It doesn't matter where it is located as long as total resistance is enough to slow the flashing. I think the relay can be replaced with one that is meant for LED's making the whole job easier. But I haven't personally looked any up.

I already have resistors installed for my tail lights since I have already installed LED replacements for the tail light turn signals. Those resistors are only sufficient to prevent hyperblinking for the tail light turn signals and a second set of resistors are needed for the front turn signals.
Your tail light turn and head light turn bulbs are connected. So as long as you have a large enough resistor on the rear blinkers, the fronts don't need them.

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I have bought a set of replacement LEDs from SuperBrightLEDs as suggested in this thread: http://www.focusrs.org/forum/32-focus-rs-lighting/55385-led-bulbs-budget.html. Since my RS hyperflashes with these bulbs installed, I also bought a load resistor kit. However, it looks like I would need to tap into the wiring harness that connects to the headlight since none of the wiring is exposed on the outside of the headlight (unlike the tail lights). All the wiring for each bulb socket are on the inside of the headlight housing and it does not appear to be feasible to install the load resistors inside the headlights without disassembling the headlight.



Has anyone been able to track down the wiring diagram for the headlight? Also, does anyone happen to know what kind of connector is used for the headlights? Another idea I’m considering is that if I can buy the connectors, I can make an extension of the harness that has the load resistors tapped to avoid modifying the factory wiring harness entirely.

Does this help - unfortunately no part numbers in service manual
Screen Shot 2017-07-17 at 5.24.18 PM.png Screen Shot 2017-07-17 at 5.25.13 PM.png
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Does this help - unfortunately no part numbers in service manual
Thanks! Unfortunately, it looks like taking apart the conduit is a bit more annoying that I would like, and this plug is likely proprietary. :/ I might just go ahead and add more resistors to the circuit on the tail lights.

Your tail light turn and head light turn bulbs are connected. So as long as you have a large enough resistor on the rear blinkers, the fronts don't need them.
To confirm since I'm an noob at electrical, since the load resistors are wired parallel with the bulbs, should the additional load resistors also be wired in parallel?
 

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To confirm since I'm an noob at electrical, since the load resistors are wired parallel with the bulbs, should the additional load resistors also be wired in parallel?
Yes. Basically, you put one wire on the + and one on the -

It is sort of like you are shorting out the wires but you aren't. Remember, the resistor will get hot! Hot enough to burn you so keep that in mind when stuffing it out of sight. The blinker isn't such a big problem but still worth considering. Also, you only need one resistor on the left and one on the right to take care of the whole car. 25W is probably enough but I have also heard of simply replacing the relay to one that is LED friendly. Maybe this is an easier route. But I have no idea if the Focus relay is a generic model though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes. Basically, you put one wire on the + and one on the -

It is sort of like you are shorting out the wires but you aren't. Remember, the resistor will get hot! Hot enough to burn you so keep that in mind when stuffing it out of sight. The blinker isn't such a big problem but still worth considering. Also, you only need one resistor on the left and one on the right to take care of the whole car. 25W is probably enough but I have also heard of simply replacing the relay to one that is LED friendly. Maybe this is an easier route. But I have no idea if the Focus relay is a generic model though.
Thanks for the pointers. It would be great if we could just replace the relay but I haven’t heard anything about whether this is feasible or what kind of relay we are using. Though, I remember that on my Subaru BRZ, the replacement relay would cause the first blink to stay on a second or two longer then usual compared to subsequent blinks.

I already have 50 W 6 Ohm resistors from Diode Dynamics installed for my rear turn signals. I will try installing the resistors I got with my front turn signal LEDs in parallel on the same circuit and test how hot they get before buttoning everything back up.
 

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Thanks for the pointers. It would be great if we could just replace the relay but I haven’t heard anything about whether this is feasible or what kind of relay we are using. Though, I remember that on my Subaru BRZ, the replacement relay would cause the first blink to stay on a second or two longer then usual compared to subsequent blinks.

I already have 50 W 6 Ohm resistors from Diode Dynamics installed for my rear turn signals. I will try installing the resistors I got with my front turn signal LEDs in parallel on the same circuit and test how hot they get before buttoning everything back up.
Holy cow. 50W resistors should be more than enough. 3 original bulbs wouldn't even draw that much. I think 15W/5W/15W Front/side/rear. You might start pooping fuses. *Popping

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Holy cow. 50W resistors should be more than enough. 3 original bulbs wouldn't even draw that much. I think 15W/5W/15W Front/side/rear. You might start pooping fuses. *Popping

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Interesting. The ones that Diode Dynamics sells with their rear turn signals are 50W according to their product images. I don’t remember the specs for the ones I got from SuperBrightLEDs but I can check both of these after I get home from work tonight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Holy cow. 50W resistors should be more than enough. 3 original bulbs wouldn't even draw that much. I think 15W/5W/15W Front/side/rear. You might start pooping fuses. *Popping
Update: yup, it looks like both the load resistors from both DD and SuperBrightLEDs have the same spec: 50 W, 6 Ohm

https://www.superbrightleds.com/mor...hyper-flash-warning-fix/190/?accessory_of=527
https://www.diodedynamics.com/store/accessories/led-accessories/resistors/led-resistor-kit-18974

Should I look for a pair of 12 Ohm resistors instead of installing a second pair of these resistors?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you really have 50W resistors and they don't work then you have another issue altogether.

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I don’t think I follow. They work fine for the rear turn signals but don’t have enough resistance to prevent hyper flashing when I replace the front turn signal bulbs with LEDs. The resistors are installed parallel with the circuit for the rear turn signal bulb.
 

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have you tried emailing DD or superbright about your issue??
maybe it's something they've encountered already
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think I’m not really clear on what the issue is. My question was whether I should mount a second set of resistors on the rear tail light circuits to account for replacing the front turn signals with LEDs. The documentation from SuperBrightLEDs says that one resistor is needed for each LED turn signal bulb and this four would be needed if both sets of front and rear bulbs are replaced.

The load resistors from both DD and SuperBrightLEDs are rated as 50 W, 6 Ohm. If I understand correctly, the 50 W rating just means that the maximum amount of power the resistors are rated to be able to take is 50 W. The resistance is what matters in terms of whether the resistor can compensate for the lower resistance of the LED bulbs compared to the filament bulbs. In this case, the two 6 Ohm resistors from the two resistors I already installed are enough to prevent hyper-flashing for the rear turn signals but are not sufficient to compensate for replacing the front turn signal bulbs with LEDs.

Is my understanding of this correct? If so, the point I want to clarify is that if I install a second resistor on each tail light turn signal circuit, should that resistor also be installed on a parallel circuit relative to the bulb since the first resistor is also parallel with the bulb?


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I kind of doubt that all of the turn signal bulbs are in a circuit.

Do you have a soldering iron? Looks like you have plenty of wire in the first picture to snip, strip, and solder the loan resistor in parallel.
 

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I think I understand your question. Assuming that the resistance measurement is for the fronts and rears all together, you should be able to install another set of resistors in the rear where there is room instead of the front. But you are asking how to get 6ohm + 6 omh = 12 ohm = serial connections, versus 6 ohm + 6 ohm = 3 ohms for parallel connection. So you would want the resistors set up with respect to each other in series but the two of them together in parallel with the rear bulbs. So, step by step, (i) R#1 has one wire patched into one of the bulb wires, (2) R#1 second wire connected to one wire on R#2 ( in series with R#1), and (3) remaining wire on R#2 connected back to other bulb wire so the set of resistors is in parallel with the bulb. Should give 12 ohms on each side for each bulb circuit. God I am stale on my old VIR calcs but I think that is what you are asking?


I think I’m not really clear on what the issue is. My question was whether I should mount a second set of resistors on the rear tail light circuits to account for replacing the front turn signals with LEDs. The documentation from SuperBrightLEDs says that one resistor is needed for each LED turn signal bulb and this four would be needed if both sets of front and rear bulbs are replaced.

The load resistors from both DD and SuperBrightLEDs are rated as 50 W, 6 Ohm. If I understand correctly, the 50 W rating just means that the maximum amount of power the resistors are rated to be able to take is 50 W. The resistance is what matters in terms of whether the resistor can compensate for the lower resistance of the LED bulbs compared to the filament bulbs. In this case, the two 6 Ohm resistors from the two resistors I already installed are enough to prevent hyper-flashing for the rear turn signals but are not sufficient to compensate for replacing the front turn signal bulbs with LEDs.

Is my understanding of this correct? If so, the point I want to clarify is that if I install a second resistor on each tail light turn signal circuit, should that resistor also be installed on a parallel circuit relative to the bulb since the first resistor is also parallel with the bulb?


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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
I think I understand your question. Assuming that the resistance measurement is for the fronts and rears all together, you should be able to install another set of resistors in the rear where there is room instead of the front. But you are asking how to get 6ohm + 6 omh = 12 ohm = serial connections, versus 6 ohm + 6 ohm = 3 ohms for parallel connection. So you would want the resistors set up with respect to each other in series but the two of them together in parallel with the rear bulbs. So, step by step, (i) R#1 has one wire patched into one of the bulb wires, (2) R#1 second wire connected to one wire on R#2 ( in series with R#1), and (3) remaining wire on R#2 connected back to other bulb wire so the set of resistors is in parallel with the bulb. Should give 12 ohms on each side for each bulb circuit. God I am stale on my old VIR calcs but I think that is what you are asking?
Thanks for the explanation. To be more clear, what I am wondering about is whether I need 6 Ohm + 6 Ohm = 3 Ohm (parallel) or whether I actually need 12 Ohms via the two resistors wired in serial. Based on the documentation included with my load resistors, the resistors are installed in parallel to the bulb for both the front and the rear, which leads me to believe that the resistors should be in parallel with each other than serial, but that is what I am not sure about.

Edit: here are the instructions from SuperBrightLEDs:

 

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Keep grinding @halleffect, I'd like to know too!

Seems strange with all the LED's and peeps out there, DD, Superbright, Carid
No one has been able to install new front AND rear LED turns without hyper flash?

I can't find any info on flasher relays, so I don't think they exists for the RS?
 
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