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So I had the opportunity to try out some new pads last week, and I was shocked that you could not replace the front pads without removing the calipers from the car. I have had brembos on several of my previous cars and it was always just pull a couple of pins and pull the pads out the top. This made track side pad changes simple and easy. Has anyone found a set of calipers that fit the OE sized rotors that would allow this method of pad change?
 

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You do exactly as you described, remove the 3 pins across the top of the pad and pull the pad out. May have to compress the pistons a tad if there is any sort of rust/wear lip on the rotor.
 

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^^^
Yep, I know there are some youtube videos out there that remove the caliper, but that's not necessary. I found them easier than changing the pads on my STI. Getting the original pads out was a little tougher only because Ford must use a lot of anti squeal grease that gets a bit hard and causes the pads to stick in the calipers maybe?
 

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Changed pads this weekend. Took me 20 minutes. Each (front) caliper is 3 pins, a 13mm bolt and a spring. Do not need to remove the caliper.
 

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Super easy to do pads on the fronts


Rotors will require removing the calipers though.

The rears require a special tool to compress the calipers
 

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Well I guess I am dumb. I tried to pull my pads out and they wouldnt budge. I saw the some videos that all showed the caliper come off and I made an assumption..
 

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Well I guess I am dumb. I tried to pull my pads out and they wouldnt budge. I saw the some videos that all showed the caliper come off and I made an assumption..
Yep, probably just had to push the pistons in to release the pads. I usually just use my hands, but there are some tools you can get to make the job easier.
 

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Super easy to do pads on the fronts


Rotors will require removing the calipers though.

The rears require a special tool to compress the calipers
The video shows him removing the caliper. If you don't remove, do the pass come out the pin side of the caliper?


Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
 

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Totally possible to swap pads without removing the calipers!

The stocks pads have some sort of adhesive back to them (or this is what it seemed to be when I pulled the pads to inspect them between two track days). You definitely need to push the pistons and pads back a bit to be able to pull the stock pads out of the adhesive.

Just gently hammer the pins with a small punch they will come out easily, remove that center bolt and sleeve and pull the pads towards the front, they will come out (is this the pin side you were referring to?).
 

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Do the pads come out toward the axle or away from the axle?

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Away from the axle. They'd hit the rotor hat if they went the other way.

As mentioned, the stock pads tend to stick the first time they're removed. Best to pull them away from the rotor, then push them back to the rotor to break whatever is causing them to stick to the pistons.
 

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The video shows him removing the caliper. If you don't remove, do the pass come out the pin side of the caliper?


Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
Woops... guess I should have double checked that video before posting...

This is the method I was talking about

 

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Quick tip if there's a lip on the rotor preventing the pads from coming out - grab the rotor itself, really hard at 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock positions, and push the top while pulling the bottom, and vice versa - HARD. This will push the pads apart just a little bit.

I change mine out all the time without removing the calipers. Just the first time is hard due to the adhesive on the piston ends, but you can gently tap something flat and metallic in there to break the glue.
 

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Do you guys crack the bleeder screw when compressing the pistons? I recently heard somebody say that this is necessary in cars with ABS because otherwise you will “push contaminants back into the ABS system.”

I can understand this if you’re working on a car with really old nasty fluid, but for my practice where I flush the fluid 2x per year and it always comes out clear, this seems unnecessary. Also I hate dealing with brake fluid (cleaning it, disposing of it) and it would get really old collecting fluid off the screw and topping off the MC twice per weekend every time I go to the track.
 

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Do you guys crack the bleeder screw when compressing the pistons? I recently heard somebody say that this is necessary in cars with ABS because otherwise you will “push contaminants back into the ABS system.”

I can understand this if you’re working on a car with really old nasty fluid, but for my practice where I flush the fluid 2x per year and it always comes out clear, this seems unnecessary. Also I hate dealing with brake fluid (cleaning it, disposing of it) and it would get really old collecting fluid off the screw and topping off the MC twice per weekend every time I go to the track.
I've not heard of this - I've only heard to keep an eye on the fluid reservoir because you are pushing fluid back toward it and could overflow it if you topped off fluid recently and you're going from highly worn pads to fresh thick ones. I wouldn't sweat it.
 

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The sticky spoken of is hi temp transfer tape which also works as a damper for noise . This tape is insanely expensive I bought a roll and was 200$😳
 

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Do you guys crack the bleeder screw when compressing the pistons? I recently heard somebody say that this is necessary in cars with ABS because otherwise you will “push contaminants back into the ABS system.”

I can understand this if you’re working on a car with really old nasty fluid, but for my practice where I flush the fluid 2x per year and it always comes out clear, this seems unnecessary. Also I hate dealing with brake fluid (cleaning it, disposing of it) and it would get really old collecting fluid off the screw and topping off the MC twice per weekend every time I go to the track.
Never heard of this either. On my previous WRX, a hard braking "exercise" was necessary as part of the bleeding procedure due to the ABS system. You basically had to activate ABS to allow the system to pump the new fluid/burp any air out of the system. Do that a couple of times, then top off fluid if necessary.

One thing that I do know on our cars, but have forgotten to do at times, is actuating the parking break a few times as part of the bleeding procedure. It's actually mentioned in our service manual and is not part of a typical bleeding procedure.
 
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