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by Cristian Gnaticov, February 20th, 2015.

The all-wheel drive system in the recently unveiled Ford Focus RS is expected to be used in order to give birth to upcoming performance models with the Blue Oval’s logo on their bodies.

Say hello to the Ford Mondeo RS because this is the only logical model to think about when hearing about the all-wheel drive system of the new Focus RS which will be used on future performance vehicles. The announcement hasn’t been made official and it is currently part of a report published by the guys from Car and Driver, who are quoting the European vice president of Ford, Joe Bakaj.

“If you look at the thread of the presentation and what we’ve used these fast Fords for in the past, a lot of mainstream technologies that we use today came from these vehicles. And I can see this as one of those technologies of the future”, said the company’s representative.


The 2016 Ford Focus RS has been unveiled over the web a few weeks back but the public debut of the hot hatch will be made next month, on the 3rd of March, during the 2015 Geneva Motor Show. This is the first time ever when the Focus RS is being offered with an all-wheel drive system and power is being provided by a 2.3 liter EcoBoost four-cylinder engine, the same one used on the mid-range Mustang, rated at 315 HP (235 kW) in this case. More performance details on the 2016 Focus RS will be announced at the Swiss automotive event.

Ford Focus RS? AWD system might give birth to future performance models
 

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From Car and Driver's interview of Raj Nair, on the Focus RS

Talk us through that system—the rear axle has a continuously turning propshaft and then two clutches that can engage each side separately?

It has. You can almost look at it as like an active limited slip, you’re actively working the clutches and so obviously doing the typical varying between front and rear torque splits, up to 70 percent to the rear. But at the rear, 100 percent is available to go to the outside wheel, that’s what’s different. We’re still using brake torque vectoring at the front, which is great for helping turn-in. But for coming out of a corner and laying power down you don’t want to lose anything. So we’re able to electronically control the clutches and infinitely vary the torque, make sure it’s all being delivered.
 
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