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IIRC, the two holes with dowels take the longer bolts. One is below the starter and the other is the silly one you can’t remove completely without removing the downpipe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 · (Edited)
Thread repair: done. It was not very difficult, the repair kit comes with all the important tools. What you need in addition is a drill, a tap driver, some glue (Loctite 271) some grease (#3 lube) and some small things like a caliper, tape, oil, and cleaning materials.

The first step is to measure the depth of the hole and mark that depth on the drill bit so you don’t inadvertently drill through.

Next, you drill, tap the new oversized thread with some oil, cut the counterbore so the insert sinks slightly below the deck surface (maybe 2/10th of a mm once installed, you don’t want it flush and certainly not protruding), clean/degrease thoroughly, put some glue in the hole and some grease on the applicator, and fit the insert tight, then remove the applicator.

It took me a half hour on the floor of the garage but it can probably be done quicker. I like those inserts, and I’m pretty confident with the repair.

My gearbox is now ready to go. This also marks a turning point: from there I only have things to assemble to get the car back together: everything is clean and ready to go and unless I break something I have everything I need.

The engine already has the turbo and all the small pipe work and solenoids, the fuel rail and injectors, the knock sensors, breather, water pump, alternator, belt tensioner and accessory belt all fitted.

Next steps: couple the gearbox to the long block, fit the PTU, put the water pipes all around the engine, then drop the whole thing in the car. I plan to start it on Saturday if everything goes well, first drive on Sunday.
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Would you happen to have a picture of the oil filter adapter panel on the block? You had a couple, but there was tape over them. I'm curious if there are 3 holes like the Mustang 2.3L or if there are just 2 holes, that would match the RS 2.3L oil filter adapter. Looking at the gasket for the RS adapter I could see it having 2 or 3 holes, so I'm not sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 · (Edited)
There are three holes but the gasket has only two. The central (small and round) hole gets covered by the gasket. The housing has holes much larger than the gasket’s holes and would cover the central hole. I’m not sure what is going on with that, maybe Ford changed their mind and used the gasket to block that hole?

The RS block definitely has a hole, square and bigger, but the steel gasket is masking the central hole.

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Discussion Starter · #65 · (Edited)
Small update: the engine is back together, with the gearbox, PTU, intake manifold, turbo, accessories and all water pipes. It needs air, water, fuel, and a few electrical connections to run.

Fitting the gearbox is always a bit challenging. The gearbox input shaft must fit into the clutch disk(s). Hopefully they are perfectly centered otherwise the gearbox will never mate and the clutch must be disassembled.

The plastic centering tool coming with most aftermarket clutches is a joke: the centering pin is much smaller than the mating hole in the crankshaft, making the clutch disc(s) alignment a little difficult. I wrapped some tape around the plastic tool to center it a little better.

Then the spline should align. You may be lucky or not. What I did this time after encountering some resistance is turn the crankshaft a tiny bit using a wrench on the crank pulley bolt.

I held the gearbox level using two planks and two round pieces of wood. One controlling the pitch and the other the roll angle. The gearbox has no flat surface underneath and it’s difficult to present it properly.

Then I lifted the engine a couple of centimeters off the ground and moved the crane and the suspended engine toward the gearbox. After a bit of fiddling I was able to engage a bolt, then two, etc.

The rest is straightforward. The PTU does not present any difficulty, the oil filter block / oil-water cooler is easy, so are the water pipes. You need a 10mm hex to torque the turbo’s water banjo into the block to 37Nm. All gearbox and PTU bolts to 47Nm. All small screws (M6) to 10Nm, intake manifold to 20Nm and that’s it.
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Ready! Only the spark plugs and coils are missing, plus two bolts near the fuel pump where the catch can attaches. I cannot fit the spark plugs yet as I need to rotate the crank with a gear engaged when coupling the rear propshaft. Next step: drop it in the car!
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dude...do u have a full time job?
you ain't playing around with this thing.

and thanks for posting that last (fully built) pic with the turbo side showing. dont get to see that too often.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
dude...do u have a full time job?
you ain't playing around with this thing.

and thanks for posting that last (fully built) pic with the turbo side showing. dont get to see that too often.
Lol that was a 7pm-midnight stint 🥵 I have to make progress, that took too long already. I hope I finish it this weekend.
 

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I'm curious what your day job is.

Awesome progress on this build. 👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
The engine is on the car! It took me about two hours to hook it up. You have to make sure the PTU output flange is aligned with the propshaft, the downpipe is aligned to the turbo, the engine mount (next to the expansion tank) is aligned with the threads on the chassis, and the gearbox mount (under the battery) is lined up, with the engine hanging on the crane. This is challenging for one person.

Next I torqued the downpipe to the turbo and the CP-e downpipe is slightly different and slightly bigger which means there is a little less space for the tools, and that makes all the difference. The rearward nut wasn’t a problem but the one facing the engine back was recalcitrant. I dropped the nut in the engine, I ended up taping it to the socket and using my endoscope to aim, otherwise there is no visibility at all. There is an angle that works but it’s challenging to find it and you need the right length extension.

I came up with a small idea to protect the wastegate solenoid which is very exposed when installing the engine: I cut a small plastic container and I taped it on top of the valve to make a bit of a protection. Last time, I broke the tiny pipe that that exits perpendicularly, and without this you have no boost control in the wrong way. When the engine is hanging and you fiddle to align it it’s easy to break the solenoid. I don’t know the weight of the whole assembly but probably something like 200kg - it can crush the valve easily.

I had to supply a nut, bolt and washers to secure the downpipe to its little hanger attached to the gearbox. The tiny hex socket + nut supplied with the downpipe is not adequate (too short, and how to you put a hex key from above?) - Small detail and to be expected with aftermarket hardware.

Hooking up the rear propshaft is a bit tedious, then the roll restrictor (aka “rear motor mount”) and finally put back the small crossmember that is just about where the downpipe meets the catback and torque the downpipe collar now that it is in its final position.

I hooked up the gearbox cables and the clutch line and bled it. The first impression is a firm pedal, certainly a lot firmer than stock but nothing crazy. I also hooked up the fuel line, the ground wire, fitted the spark plugs and the coils, and the upper catch can.

Next steps are fitting the electrical harness, the lower front bar, the battery tray and the battery, the intake pipes, then the front block, the airbox, connect the boost pipes, water radiator, my secondary oil cooler pipes, the windscreen washer reservoir and a few more connectors. Then the front propshafts, attach the knuckles, fit the brake cooling ducts and scoops, fill up the coolant, engine oil, gearbox oil, and PTU oil. Then it should start 😋 Hopefully tomorrow Saturday.

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That nut is terrible. When I swapped everything, I installed the downpipe before installing the motor. It helped I had already lowered the crossmember to install the front sway bar. Probably required a little more maneuvering than yours. But I already had to do more maneuvering anyway because I left the AC compressor and condenser connected. I was able to strap the compressor up and out of the way and prop / swing the condenser out of the way.

Props to you for taking pictures and documenting so much!

I’m terrible at documenting this stuff. I need to get a cheap camera I can get dirty. I never want to touch my stupidly expensive phone…
 
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Yup, great documentation! For the cp-e nuts, I've had mine out a bunch of times and get both nuts started blindly by feel with my fingers. For the support bracket, I have been putting the nut on top and the allen on the bottom. I get a wrench on the nut (which is possible from underneath) to hold that, while I tighten the allen bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 · (Edited)
Long story short: Saturday was busy but the engine didn’t get started yet.

I think everything except the front (radiators etc) is done. I put back the front proshafts, knuckles, tightened the big nuts, fitted the engine harness, the battery, the intake and boost pipes, filled engine oil, PTU and gearbox oils, I have no parts left besides the front (8 bolts) the windscreen washer reservoir (2 bolts) and the bumper. I have to rince the intercooler and find a way to flush the oil radiator, connect the remaining electric plugs (the TIP sensor, and the other plugs going to the front, baro pressure, ambiant air temp, hood open switch) and put the headlights, then fill the coolant, which will be a 40/60 mix of yellow concentrate and distilled water + Water Wetter and UV die.

First I wanted to go for 30/70 but according to the notice on the coolant concentrate, that mix offers no anti-freeze protection and I don’t want this liability on that car (having to flush and replace the coolant before winter) - for a track car that would be different and I’d go for 20/80 with Water Wetter as summer juice.
Still on track for Sunday 🤞
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Discussion Starter · #74 · (Edited)
Fertig. Finito. Done.

Did I start it yet? No. I ran into small complications and missed my 7pm oil change slot at the local self-service garage, then changed plan.

I had to fix the thread that is used to hold the intake pipe, next to the vacuum pump on the intake camshaft, then I needed a new hose termination for the new breather, then more fit and finish with the harness and pipes to make sure nothing rubs.

I filled the coolant mix using a vacuum system, all the pipes collapse then you close the system, wait to see if the vacuum holds, then open the coolant tap and the car sucks 9.2 liters in about a minute, this is very cool and you are more or less sure there is no air pocket somewhere in the system. Then I cleaned the oil radiator, installed the front, connected everything and installed the bumper.

I did not start it although I was ready at 8pm. The neighbor facing my exhaust has a little baby and I need to run the engine at 3000rpm straight from the start for at least 10 minute before driving to the garage for the first oil change and inspection, so that will wait until tomorrow.

The car is on the ground, no error message, I cleaned it and it looks happy tombe reborn.

I did a little tour in the dark with the UV light: so far so good 😊

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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
Long story short: it runs.

There was some drama but nothing catastrophic.

I drove 1/2 gas tank by now, and changed the oil once already. I do an old-school break-in: break-in oil with high zinc and low detergent. 15-20 minutes of accelerated idle (2500-3000) immediately at startup for the cams and tappets, change the oil, then drive at medium load / medium speed for a couple of engine hours, change the oil again, then gradually increase the load and speed and the length of the « pulls » over the next couple of hours of engine run time, change the oil once more for the final synth 5w50. That’s about 4-5 hours in total, that should do and I’m half way through that process.

The clutch is great. It’s the less noisy of all aftermarket clutches I had so far. The engagement is quite dry and there is a squeaking noise from time to time when feathering in first. Other than that it’s great. I expect some change when it beds-in.

I recorded the startup with a couple of cameras but I don’t feel like editing right now. Here is just a bit of engine noise from the driver’s seat, door open and inside the garage for your listening pleasure.
 

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I recorded the startup with a couple of cameras but I don’t feel like editing right now. Here is just a bit of engine noise from the driver’s seat, door open and inside the garage for your listening pleasure.
i can tell you have a light crank and BS delete...the rpm needle bounces quicker.
sounds cammy too...classic cam grunt sound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 · (Edited)
I’ve installed mine dry. Cleaned the crank with brake cleaner, lint free cloth, and let dry for a few minutes. No leaks 🤞. I don’t have any experience with lube on the crank.

I was a little surprised to see @axelr installed the oil pan before the rear main seal. It makes it a little harder to get the seal on straight and seal the surfaces between the sides of the seal and the oil pan. But, as long as you add the extra sealant on the sides it works fine.
I want to come back to the oil pan or no oil pan conversation: I found the instructions for the older seal (the bronze-looking one, with a fabric-looking ring on the outside, which comes with a white plastic tool inserted in the seal), and there are two distinct sets of instructions for this one:

a) Remove the oil pan, and push the seal straight.

b) Discard the plastic tool that comes preinstalled on the seal, use the Ford 303-328 (T88P-6701-B1) tool instead, and come at an angle, push downwards toward the oil pan, and tilt the seal.

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The newer ones comes without the plastic tool, and the instruction are similar to variant (b). The older instruction are dated 2011 and the new ones 2019. Also the seal cannot be rotated or shifted in any direction as the two middle holes are doweled: the sheet metal is stamped in a way that guarantees alignment and the holes in the block are larger on those two.

One crucial thing that is often overlooked is the bottom two bolts of the rear seal are on the girdle while the other four are on the block. The girdle is not positioned by dowels and can move longitudinally about one millimeter or so when the 10 studs/bolts are only finger-tight.

It is important to align the rear of the girdle with the plane where the other four holes of the rear seal are on the block, so the seal stands flat with all six holes on the same plane.

It is possible the lower two threaded holes are up to 0.5mm-ish protruding or recessed if the girdle is not flush, and that will bend the lower part of the seal one way or the other when it gets torqued, with possible consequences on the sealing as it puts weird tensions around the giant round seal.

In the meantime I removed the flywheel of the v1 engine and had a close look at the seal: it was not leaking so, empirically, lubing the crankshaft (thin film of Sachs spline grease) had no adverse effect.
 

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I want to come back to the oil pan or no oil pan conversation: I found the instructions for the older seal (the bronze-looking one, with a fabric-looking ring on the outside, which comes with a white plastic tool inserted in the seal), and there are two distinct sets of instructions for this one:

a) Remove the oil pan, and push the seal straight.

b) Discard the plastic tool that comes preinstalled on the seal, use the Ford 303-328 (T88P-6701-B1) tool instead, and come at an angle, push downwards toward the oil pan, and tilt the seal.

View attachment 361232
View attachment 361231
The newer ones comes without the plastic tool, and the instruction are similar to variant (b). The older instruction are dated 2011 and the new ones 2019. Also the seal cannot be rotated or shifted in any direction as the two middle holes are doweled: the sheet metal is stamped in a way that guarantees alignment and the holes in the block are larger on those two.

One crucial thing that is often overlooked is the bottom two bolts of the rear seal are on the girdle while the other four are on the block. The girdle is not positioned by dowels and can move longitudinally about one millimeter or so when the 10 studs/bolts are only finger-tight.

It is important to align the rear of the girdle with the plane where the other four holes of the rear seal are on the block, so the seal stands flat with all six holes on the same plane.

It is possible the lower two threaded holes are up to 0.5mm-ish protruding or recessed if the girdle is not flush, and that will bend the lower part of the seal one way or the other when it gets torqued, with possible consequences on the sealing as it puts weird tensions around the giant round seal.

In the meantime I removed the flywheel of the v1 engine and had a close look at the seal: it was not leaking so, empirically, lubing the crankshaft (thin film of Sachs spline grease) had no adverse effect.
All good info. Both “a” & “b” work.

If you go by the assembly portion of the manual you’ll see “a” is shown, but also includes using Special Service Tool: 303-328.

“b” is used when you haven’t already removed the oil pan i.e. replacing a leaking rear main seal.

I’ve done it both ways. But the one time I tried the tilt method there was a small leak where the seal met the oil pan. Luckily, I only needed to drop the oil pan, clean it off and reseal. Could’ve been worse.

Did you happen to get a picture of the new seal design? I recently saw MAP has a billet seal for 3x the price of the OEM seal. It’s a bit different then the last one I saw floating around with screws to hold the seal in place.
 
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