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Do you feel that the 2.0 (Fusion/TS) block is superior to the 2.3 RS block with an aftermarket deck support/brace?
Thanks!
I think he is saying that for overall strength and resistance to cracking...the fusion 2.0 is better.
but the RS 2.3 has additional cooling ports..better bore and deck finishing..and better oil jets.
so unless you are building a 600+ wheel hp monster...the RS block is better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
I mentioned earlier I could not find the tool to pop the giant Ford rivets that plugs the main oil gallery on the Fusion 2.0 block. There is a 3rd rivet, much smaller, that goes just under the water pump housing and that can be popped using any heavy duty rivet tool able to handle 1/4” rivets.

My block is with the machine shop now and they are blocking those holes using NPT pipe plugs, which is a tried and true, reliable solution.

In the meantime, I received my stainless steel plugs and I want to document this here as a possible solution.

The thread is M18x1.5 which is very common as it’s used for O2 sensors and oil pans.

The drill size for M18x1.5 is 16.5mm and the holes are 16mm so it might be necessary to drill them a hair bigger to match the M18 specs. You need 11-12mm of useable thread.

You can tap as deep as you want as the gallery goes all the way across the engine, but I’d use a blind-hole tap and make about 11-12mm of good thread.

The plug will go about 10-10.5mm down, and that also means it won’t obstruct the oil flow to a side hole at the front, who tangents 11mm from the surface. You cannot use a deeper plug because it would obstruct that hole, that goes to the other side of the engine to lubricate the turbo.

This is the exact plug I base this on and it would fit perfectly: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08F4ZDXQW

If you DIY you’ll need a 16.5mm drill bit in addition to an M18x1.5 blind-hole tap, or you can try taping the 16mm hole directly but it would be a disaster to break the tap half way down the hole so I don’t know if I’d risk it. You need to clean the block after tapping, as you just put debris in the oil gallery.

There is 4.5mm of headroom at the front between the block and the timing chain guide.

It is possible to use a slim plug + crush washer that will just pass underneath the guide.

Note the guide is not moving (the tensioner is on the other side) and that it is plastic and could be skimmed a few tenths of a millimeter underneath without any prejudice. I think it would just pass once the crush washer gets crushed but surely you don’t want anything touching the plug so that would be something to verify and adjust if necessary.

There are no clearance concerns at the rear of the engine (flywheel side) with that plug. I’d secure the plugs with Loctite 271, a medium hard temp resistant threadlocker.

Here are some pictures. I personally like this better than the conical NPT pipe plugs but it’s really a matter of preferences at this point.

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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
The block is back with the NPT oil gallery plugs installed!

The shop did a light pass on the deck, which was not completely flat. Likely the result of temperature changes during a few years of storage and internal tensions in the casting. It took 0.002” (50 microns) to rectify.

They also did a super-light pass on top of my honing with a diamond hone. The diamond makes very clean cuts at the microscopic level, allowing to cut deeper valleys (to retain more oil) without removing much material on the bore surface: that pass took away 0.0003” or about 8 microns off the surface. The shop said they were surprised by the hardness of the bores.

The theory says that the thinner the rings, the deeper the valleys (RvK) need to be in the honing to retain more oil, the smoother the peaks must be on the bore surface where the rings seat, and the flatter the crosshatch angle. It all makes sense of you think about it.

The JE pistons have a 1 mm nitrided steel top ring: thin, and super hard with no oil retaining abilities.

I’ve asked Eric Cady at JE Pistons what he thought of a 180 grit honing + 500 grit plateau and he said that should be sufficient. The shop made my 180 grit base deeper and more even using diamonds 👍 It looks coarse but it’s deceptive as it’s very smooth to the touch.

The shop also recommended what is known as the “CMD Lube #3” for the main and head studs nuts as opposed to the ARP grease. They say the “#3” lubes just as well but is easily soluble in engine oil, while the ARP grease tends to leave sticky deposits in the oil pan. As a matter of fact, my Carrillo rods came with a tube of the same brown lube as the #3, so I guess I’ll just use that for the ARP studs and bolts as well.

I have to say a big thank you to Action Machine Shop in Shoreline, WA for the top quality job on the head and the block, and fast turnarounds. I found them very knowledgeable and passionate.

Tomorrow: engine assembly!

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Will you choose to build your 2.3 block, instead of the 2nd generation 2.0 block?
yup! with darton sleeves or something similar (cylinder support system)
main goal is to forge the internals and make them lighter...so less susceptible to LSPI or rod breakage.
then get that head breathing better and higher degree cams (piper v2).
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 · (Edited)
Built! Well, almost. All the importants bits are in place and torqued; and the thing it timed, but I don’t trust my timing chain tensioner as, when trying to rearm it, I bent that little retainer circlip that prevents the tensioner’s piston to back off (so it works like a ratchet) and I’d rather prefer having a good one.

Also I misplaced two little screws, the ones that hold the variable timing solenoids so the build is suspended.

After those small things I can close the front and top covers and it’s done.

I’ve installed a new oil pump uprated by Mountune (they increase the oil pressure some 10%) and you could tweak it if you wanted as it come with four tiny Belleville washers.

There is maybe two hours left including the small things, dowels, studs.

The stud guys want you to torque and undo three times at 48Nm then undo once more and do a three steps. The shop recommended I do this with an old gasket or that I do the cycles one nut at a time so here is what I did:

24Nm x10 (according to Ford ceremony) then 48Nm x10, then 10x 0Nm, 48Nm, 0Nm, 48Nm, then 68Nm x10, then 108Nm x10,

In other words I did the 3x one-by-one in Ford order as a step toward the final torque. This way the gasket never got unclamped as only one bolt at a time was cycled, and the specified cycling torque is less than half the final torque so I’m not too worried about warping the head doing so.

I applied the extra sealant at the two points that were mentioned in a bulletin, where the block, the head, and the front cover meet.

Cleaning the parts that gets reused is essential, 3M is our best friend (Brake Cleaner and Scotch Brite)

I have the timing kit with the TDC plug, but I always check for TDC using the only true way: by measuring the top dead center of piston #1 using a comparator.

This time the plug and the piston agreed exactly, but this was not the case with another lightened crankshaft that came built into an engine before: either it was warped or the part where the plug touches the counterweight had been modified, Ondont know for sure but it was about 3° off.

The engine did its first two complete revolutions, an important milestone.

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
The bare block is now a long block 😁 My 9-yo gave a hand last week-end so he gets to see his name on it 😌

There is one bolt left to torque (the crank pulley) then the rear seal, flywheel, clutch, turbo, and water pump, then move all pipes and accessories (thermostat, crankcase breather, vacuum pump, fuel pump, belt tensioner, oil cooler/filter block, connect the gearbox and PTU, and drop it into the car. Work will resume on Friday.
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Discussion Starter · #33 · (Edited)
I think maybe four-five hours and the engine + turbo, gearbox and PTU, the whole thing, is on the floor. It should be doable in three-four hours with two persons working.

The pain points for me are disconnecting the knuckles, and disconnecting the rear propshaft from the PTU - these can be a little frustrating.

Everything else is pretty much straightforward if you have the tools. You can remove the entire front without messing with the fans and radiators all these stay assembled and the entire block comes off after disconnecting water pipes, intake pipes, A/C pipes, and electrical connectors. The whole bumper and front takes a little more than an hour, maybe two hours the first time.

The car is on jack stands and I use a harbor freight transmission jack to hold the whole front assembly at once, strapped and at the right height and I roll it to the side.

I use colored tapes to mark the connectors and where they go, that saves some time.

These are pics from the last time I did it, two years ago I think.
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The entire group just before going in. I had forgotten the PTU heat shield, a 30sec job here, or 1-hour and many curse words to do on the car. This is the engine I’ll be pulling out this weekend.
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You da Man!!👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 · (Edited)
Am I becoming a Moutune fanboy? 🤔 I had a Radium breather plate and catch can and while the can caught something (maybe a half can per oil change cycle, or 1-2dl per 5’000km) I still have some fair amount of deposit on the intake valves. I’m trying the Mountune “thick” breather this time.

One thing is the MT plate uses the stock PCV while the Radium plate comes with its own. The stock PCV (new or used) seems to leak a bit of pressure when blowing backward. Not sure this is significant but it definitely leaks a little, while the Radium PCV don’t.

I’ve seen on YouTube some of those MT breathers being all oily around the pipe connection, so I helped mine with a better o-ring (Viton) and some RTV. Hopefully it will stay dry.
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Question: Since your in the middle of a build, you could probably tell me is the crankshaft pulley bolt loosen clock wise or counter- clockwise? I'm wanting to pull the front cover and having trouble removing the bolt on the front pulley.
 

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Am I becoming a Moutune fanboy? 🤔 I had a Radium breather plate and catch can and while the can caught something (maybe a half can per oil change cycle, or 1-2dl per 5’000km) I still have some fair amount of deposit on the intake valves. I’m trying the Mountune “thick” breather this time.

One thing is the MT plate uses the stock PCV while the Radium plate comes with its own. The stock PCV (new or used) seems to leak a bit of pressure when blowing backward. Not sure this is significant but it definitely leaks a little, while the Radium PCV don’t.

I’ve seen on YouTube some of those MT breathers being all oily around the pipe connection, so I helped mine with a better o-ring (Viton) and some RTV. Hopefully it will stay dry.
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I've had way less black soot on the back of my car after switching to the V2 breather plate. Guessing that it does a better job than the V1 breather plate due to the labyrinth, so less junk on the intake valves but more junk back in the oil.
 
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