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Don't want to state the obvious but have you talked to Cobb about this situation. They are a reputable company with good technical response.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Don't want to state the obvious but have you talked to Cobb about this situation. They are a reputable company with good technical response.
I did reach out for additional clarification/photos; but nothing just yet. Most likely due to the current national situation. There is no issue with the product beyond my own technical capabilities and experience, and I’m much more confident now. Once my car is done getting ceramic coatings and tint I’ll head back under the hood. I’m actually really excited for a second crack at it. Cheers!
 

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I think PTP made it for Cobb, there is a thread for the group buy how to tackle this.

We are all friends here, different strokes for different folks what they don their car.

We are all here to learn from each other.

Stay healthy guys and gals.
 

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You have the right attitud. Every time you do something to your car, you know her a little better. My jobs always take 3 times longer, because I get looking around at other parts. I’m also a compulsive cleaner.
You’re right to not give up, but chill, then hit it again. If you fail, come at it from a different angle, try a different tool.
You can’t always see what you’re doing. Close your eyes and concentrate on what your hands are feeling and develop a mental picture.
You’re also learning, these aftermarket parts, more often than not, need some massaging to fit.
Not trying to be your sensei. It’s nice to see someone expand there skills and experience.
Which by the way, is something EVERYBODY does, every time they pick up a hammer.
I like the "hammer"...nice to see you guys getting along better.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Update!!!

So I went back under the car yesterday and took off more pieces to get a better look at this turbo.



I was under and on top of this car for about 6 hours with many breaks(out of pure frustration at my inadequacies with automobile anatomy knowledge).

I think the only way I will personally be able to get this thing on is if I completely remove the turbo setup, or at least remove the wastegate actuator. I just don’t have enough experience to understand what it is I’m doing yet, and that’s incredibly frustrating. The more I wrenched at it, I seemed to be risking breaking/bending hard lines in the engine bay or ripping up my blanket further.

Gonna youtube how to remove more parts of the engine today, nurse whatever the hell I pulled in my back yesterday, and pick all the volcanic rock and steel dust out of my eyes.



My now battle-scarred blanket. Woof.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Man I was looking at getting one of these but after seeing this thread I might reconsider. Best of luck to you.
I’m just reeeeeaally new to working on cars myself. I’m sure it’s much easier than I’m making it for myself; but it’s definitely not as easy as the instructions make it seem.

In the end I know it’s a good choice to wrap imo, which is why I keep trying to do it before asking for help or just paying for the work. It definitely improves engine bay and hood temperatures, which in turn protects the various plastics and rubbers throughout the engine, and keeps the turbo running more efficiently by keeping in the heat.
 

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I’m just reeeeeaally new to working on cars myself. I’m sure it’s much easier than I’m making it for myself; but it’s definitely not as easy as the instructions make it seem.

In the end I know it’s a good choice to wrap imo, which is why I keep trying to do it before asking for help or just paying for the work. It definitely improves engine bay and hood temperatures, which in turn protects the various plastics and rubbers throughout the engine, and keeps the turbo running more efficiently by keeping in the heat.
Well that's probably true, but this would be a proper bastard of a job even for the experienced and there comes a point where you end up compromising other stuff and that outweighs the benefit.
No shame in giving up on stuff like this and writing off the experience as a learning.
Personally I dont see a massive benefit in wrapping the turbo anyway. Sure there are lots of theoretical benefits but this is a production car with components designed and tested to do a lot of miles in a std configuration so I dont see much to be gained by some perceived protection of componentry.
It also means that when you shut down the engine instead of the turbo losing its heat via thermosyphoning and radiation the blanket effectively traps the heat in and the thermosyphon does all the work. What you want on shutdown is to shed the heat from the turbo as fast as possible to avoid cooking the oil trapped in the housing. The blanket isn't going to help with that.

Ciao
 

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As above^

+

if Ford thought it needed it for longevity, it would already be on the car, would be my way of perceiving it....?‍♂
 

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Update!!!

So I went back under the car yesterday and took off more pieces to get a better look at this turbo.



I was under and on top of this car for about 6 hours with many breaks(out of pure frustration at my inadequacies with automobile anatomy knowledge).

I think the only way I will personally be able to get this thing on is if I completely remove the turbo setup, or at least remove the wastegate actuator. I just don’t have enough experience to understand what it is I’m doing yet, and that’s incredibly frustrating. The more I wrenched at it, I seemed to be risking breaking/bending hard lines in the engine bay or ripping up my blanket further.

Gonna youtube how to remove more parts of the engine today, nurse whatever the hell I pulled in my back yesterday, and pick all the volcanic rock and steel dust out of my eyes.



My now battle-scarred blanket. Woof.
One secret of performing these types of primary mechanical learning is to recognize and avoid "going too far".
Taking pictures as you go will make it much more likely to get everything back together properly. Also when you start to get frustrated, walk away for a while.... fatigue is your enemy.
Based on how you have approached it so far, I predict that you will be successful....We're all be proud of you!!!
 

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I destroyed the first one I bought fighting it for several hours. I cut up my hand and scratched my arm up. It was extremely frustrating. I talked it thru with Cobb, ordered a second one at a discounted price, and attempted it again. I have done a ton of work on cars and this is by far the most challenging thing I've ever tried. I gave up. I believe that even if you are lucky enough to get it on, it will never be as clean of an install as shown in their pictures unless you take the turbo off your car and do it. To me it's not worth it.
 

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This may not help but I went through this fiasco and spent more time getting that damn bottom stud out that held on the heat shield. I got mine from PTP and it ended up being one of those challenges that I wasn't going to let defeat me. I cut up my hands and got to the point of only speaking jibberish but I do recall that I went through the top to start the blanked and then used an extended (very long) needle nose pliers to grab it from below and the damn thing literally slid into place. Mine used the springs to hold it together and that part went well. Also, the PTP installation instructions were very accurate and I had to read them several times to grasp what I was doing. Really, if it wasn't for the heat shield stud I probably would have had the entire job done in 1 hour with sips of coffee as I got through it. The extended needle nose pliers was a huge help and I picked them up at Harbor Freight as a throw away tool that has ended up being a long time favorite.
 
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