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I will machine the crank for a key set, then broach the crank gear and pulley at the shop. I need to doublecheck if and how those parts need to be aligned before I go cut them. When I do this I'll take a video to post.
Jim,

Yes the Crank pulley needs to be aligned for proper reading of the crank sensor.
 

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Is there a thread that outlines <!-- BEGIN TEMPLATE: dbtech_usertag_mention -->
@<a href="http://www.focusrs.org/forum/member.php?u=12097" target="_blank">bludrgn</a>
<!-- END TEMPLATE: dbtech_usertag_mention --> 's experience?
I really like the cams. For a street car, they're about as aggressive as I'd want to go. You can hear them here:

 

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Discussion Starter #64
I've been super busy but finally got some more measuring done today, as well as much of the thread chasing on the block. I installed the ARP main studs, lubed up the studs and nuts, then torqued down the main caps. Then I measured all the main bores vertically and horizontally (across the split of the main caps) then measured all the journals on the crank. The block was quite consistent and the crank was so close that with a good micrometer I couldn't detect any variation at all. Both the main and rod journals are the same nominal diameter. Here's the updated build sheet:

Build Sheet 021918.jpg

Checking Journal #2:

Measuring Block Main Journal 2.jpg

I was able to set the micrometer and use it as a Go/No-Go gauge on the crank, they were all that close:

Crank Journal Measuring1.jpg

Then I started cleaning every threaded hole in the block with metric thread chasers. I use the picture of that side of the block I am cleaning to mark after each hole is cleaned (red marks). Using blue marks, I'll use the same photo to confirm that I've torqued each fastener correctly as well as marking that fastener:

Chasing Threads & Marking1.jpg

Next I'll put in the crank bearings, torque down the main caps again and measure the ID. The on to the rods and their journals, without then with bearings.

Trust but verify!
 

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Discussion Starter #65 (Edited)
In performing all these measures it is important to have a clear picture of where you want to end up, and not just know your targets in advance but to understand why they are important.

A critical measure in our motor is the main crankshaft bearing to journal clearance. For the HP target I had in mind, a clearance right around .0025" seemed perfect, based on research I have done.

Specifically, from resource #1 below:

"For high revving performance engines, some bearing manufacturers recommend rod bearing clearances of .002" to .003:, with an absolute minimum clearance of no less than .0015". The tighter the clearances, the tighter the geometry requirements are for the crank journals (as round, straight and smooth as possible with little or no taper).


Street engines can benefit from tighter tolerances and thinner oils for everyday driving. But when power adders such as nitrous oxide, turbocharging or supercharging are used, or the engine’s power output gets up in the 450 to 500 plus horsepower range, looser bearing clearances are probably safer to accommodate crankshaft flexing, main bore and rod bore distortion.


The same reasoning applies to drag motors, truck pull engines and other performance engines that produce serious horsepower. Many of these engines are built with rod and main bearing clearances in the .0025" to .003" range.
"


Here are a couple great resources:


  1. Engine Builders Mag (enginebuildersmag.com): Bearing Clearances
  2. Mahle-Aftermarket.com: How Much Clearance Do Your Bearings Need?
  3. Engine Labs (enginelabs.com): Clearing the Air on Bearing Clearances

Here are the stock critical measures for our crank:

Main bearing journal diameter 51.980-52.000 mm (2.046-2.047 in.) <-- My journals all measured at 2.0462
Production repair 51.730-51.750 mm (2.036-2.037 in.)
Main bearing clearance 0.019-0.035 mm (0.0007-0.0013 in.) <-- Notice the stock desired clearances
End play 0.22-0.43 mm (0.008-0.016 in.)


So I selected the King Bearing's STDX main set which gives an extra .001" of clearance.

And here's my build sheet so far:

Build Sheet 022118.jpg

On Line 18 of the spreadsheet you can see that these slightly oversized King bearings got me almost exactly to my .0025" clearance target. Without the extra .001" of clearance they would have been much closer to the stock range, and uncomfortably tight for a high performance motor.


Next I'll lower the crank in and carefully check the end play, then move on to the connecting rod measurements and clearances. There's a ton of cleaning to do before any assembly, but before I install the crank and rods I'll do a sanity check on each with a piece of Plastigage.

Main Bores wBearings1.jpg
 

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I can't tell you how much I am enjoying your build thread! It's been years since I built an engine from ground up and your posts have reminded how much I really enjoyed the process, even the late nights when things just don't work out as planned.

Keep up the great work and write-ups. If I'm lucky, maybe you will let me see this beast during one of my weekly trips to San Jose.

Shawn
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Although this short video is of a Mazda naturally-aspirated 2.3L assembly animation, at least 90% of it pertains to our motors:

2.3L Assembly Animation


It seems you must click on the arrow in the center of the movie screen then click the grey "Play" arrow on the bottom left of the movie screen to play it.
 

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Next I'll lower the crank in and carefully check the end play, then move on to the connecting rod measurements and clearances. There's a ton of cleaning to do before any assembly, but before I install the crank and rods I'll do a sanity check on each with a piece of Plastigage.
Just an FYI that you might consider. Each time you torque down your main and rod caps you diminish the amount of "crush" in your bearings. In other words each time you squeeze the bearings into their respective bores then release them the metal begins to relax and not spring outward with as much force as the first time they were torqued. It is this "crush" that is the primary means of bearing retention.

If you use a precision dial bore gage to check your housing bores and use a ball end adapter on your 0-1" mike to measure your bearing thickness at the crown you have an exact set of numbers to calculate your bearing oil clearance. In fact this method is a good bit more accurate than using Plastigage. This will result in better reliability of the bearings once pressed into service.

BTW, great build you have going there.
 

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Discussion Starter #70 (Edited)
Just an FYI that you might consider. Each time you torque down your main and rod caps you diminish the amount of "crush" in your bearings. In other words each time you squeeze the bearings into their respective bores then release them the metal begins to relax and not spring outward with as much force as the first time they were torqued. It is this "crush" that is the primary means of bearing retention.

If you use a precision dial bore gage to check your housing bores and use a ball end adapter on your 0-1" mike to measure your bearing thickness at the crown you have an exact set of numbers to calculate your bearing oil clearance. In fact this method is a good bit more accurate than using Plastigage. This will result in better reliability of the bearings once pressed into service.

BTW, great build you have going there.
For sure, always good to remember. These bearings are the correct size, though, and repeated tightenings shouldn't force the material to yield.

From the Clevite brochure:
POSSIBLE CAUSES

Bearings are designed to be a slight interference
fit in in their housing bore. Bearing “crush”, which
is designed into the bearing, controls this.
Installing a bearing in an undersize housing hole
increases crush and will cause the steel back
to yield
and get thicker at the point of least

resistance. This is generally at an oil hole or
adjacent to the parting lines if there is no hole.

If the bearing is correctly sized crush should be repeatable.

Whole Clevite brochure here: Major Causes of Bearing Failure
 

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Discussion Starter #71
Just got back in town so I will get cracking on this again.

Ordered the Mountune V2 cam and spring kit, and also a new RS cylinder head assembly ($869 delivered, including $250 core, P/N G1FZ-6049-A) as I have decided to port my own head as opposed to sending it out.
 

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I have decided to port my own head as opposed to sending it out.
I'm very interested to see how you do porting the head. I haven’t seen inside one but I’ve been told that there isn’t all that much material to work with. I want flowbench before and afters!
 

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Discussion Starter #73
I'm very interested to see how you do porting the head. I haven’t seen inside one but I’ve been told that there isn’t all that much material to work with. I want flowbench before and afters!
Well, I probably won't be flowing it unfortunately, just cleanup and blending. I'm not expecting a lot of access on the exhaust side except at the outlet of the twin-scroll ports, but the basic bowl work, blending and a good valve job should get me ~70% of the possible gains. I suspect that last ~30% requires a flow-tested CNC job for $$$.
 

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Discussion Starter #74
Just got back in town so I will get cracking on this again.

Ordered the Mountune V2 cam and spring kit, and also a new RS cylinder head assembly ($869 delivered, including $250 core, P/N G1FZ-6049-A) as I have decided to port my own head as opposed to sending it out.
FYI on this RS cylinder head, Ford has released a new revision, the G1FZ-6049-B which replaces the G1FZ-6049-A. No details on what changed; the only thing I can see is the price raised by ~$40. Total now is $905 delivered. If I had to guess what the change(s) was I would bet on a tighter spec for the head surface, smoother.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
Got some block prep and a sanity check on the main bearing clearance today.

First I partially installed a couple dowels in the deck to register the gasket to the holes:

Partially Setting Dowel.jpg

Then I used a Sharpie to mark all the coolant holes that needed matching to the gasket:

Marking Coolant Holes in Block.jpg

Here they are all marked, circled in Red:

Holes Marked for Matching.jpg

Then I did a first cut on all the holes where the grinder would be moving towards me. For the others, I rotate the block around as I have much better control over the carbide tool when I can gently pull it towards me. The tool is so aggressive in aluminum that it's easy to screw up if I'm not super careful:

First Cut wTool.jpg

It's hard to tell but I then used the Dremel flex-shaft and a grinding tool to blend the first cut in a bit, basically removing the sharp cutline:

First Hole after Blending.jpg

All the holes have been cut then blended:

All Matching Done.jpg

And here's a view with the gasket back in place - some of the holes are angled and don't photograph too well:

Matched wGasket.jpg

Different angle shows some of the holes in a better light:

Matched wGasket2.jpg

Then I removed the dowels as I will need the deck to be flat again when I file-fit the rings, so that nice ring-positioning tool I made can sit flat in each cylinder.

Then it was time to use a piece of PlastiGage to do a sanity check on the main bearing clearance. I chose the center crank journal and laid a piece of PlastiGage in place after carefully setting the crank in place without rotating it at all - no lube in place yet so rotating would damage the bearings:

PlastiGage in Place.jpg

Mains torqued with the crank in place after placing the cap girdle on carefully so as to not disturb the PlastiGage:

Mains Torqued wPlastiGage.jpg

And after removing the cap girdle again carefully, I cut the appropriate piece of the PlastiGage measuring sleeve and put it next to the compressed Plastigage, and cut n' pasted part of the picture onto the scale:

PlastiGage Shows OK wComparison Piece.jpg

In my build spreadsheet that bearing clearance shows as .0024" and the PlastiGage shows right around .0020" which for a sanity check is spot on.

Maybe tonight I'll get to measuring the rod big ends, installing the bearings and getting my clearances. If not tonight, by Saturday as tomorrow is booked solid.
 

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Loving the thread Delta, anxious to see it finished :)
Delta i got a question, why not drill the gasket holes instead of shaving the block for those coolant passages?
 

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Discussion Starter #78 (Edited)
Loving the thread Delta, anxious to see it finished :)
Delta i got a question, why not drill the gasket holes instead of shaving the block for those coolant passages?
I've tried drilling MLS gaskets once before and it cost me a ~$100 gasket. Really the best way to do holes in an MLS is to punch them out. If you have to do them at home it's best to unrivet the layers and mod them one by one. Lastly the metal-only MLS gaskets are easier to modify than those like ours with a coating on them. And none of the holes in this block were completely blocked, so with an easy-to-modify aluminum block and no mods needed in super-critical areas, that's the route I chose.

Also today I called the parts dealer I ordered the head from and added 2 intake valves and 2 exhaust valves for the RS. These will be sacrificial valves that I will put in place to protect the seats while I work on the chambers. Total was ~$28. When I get the head I'll number all the valves before I take them out for porting.
 

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Discussion Starter #80 (Edited)
There's a video in this thread about the 2.3 block's known-weak areas: stock 2.3 block

But here's the critical area compared:

ST 2.0 Block vs MEB 2.3 Block Rear2.jpg

This is the best shot I have of the unpainted blocks oriented the identical way. Look at the difference in mass and reinforcement in the 2.0. Section B on the 2.0 has an entire outer wall where the 2.3 has a deep depression, and Section A isn't much better. On the left side my 2.0 block is masked for painting with blue tape on all the machined surfaces.
 
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