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Ford Focus RS: Is it really a family car?

This is a discussion on Ford Focus RS: Is it really a family car? within the News forums, part of the Site News category; by Adam Binnie The Focus RS is an odd combination of things — on one hand it’s one of the fastest, most extreme cars that ...

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Thread: Ford Focus RS: Is it really a family car?

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    Ford Focus RS: Is it really a family car?

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    by Adam Binnie

    The Focus RS is an odd combination of things — on one hand it’s one of the fastest, most extreme cars that Ford makes, but one the other it’s a five door hatchback with a big boot.

    Fast Fords have long been sold on this principle, weekday racers capable of shaming supercars that can settle down into the routine of family life on the weekend.

    Previous generations of the Focus ST (a model that sits above the diesel company car range and below the big-winged road rocket you see before you) have toed the line between speed and practicality very well — it’s arguably the ultimate fun family car.

    So can this even faster version pull off the same trick with the addition of even more performance, or has its core pragmatism been compromised in the pursuit of speed?

    M&B takes the Ford Focus RS for a spin

    Mother&Baby Web Editor Sophie Knight put the RS to the test, to see if it really could work as a family car.

    “Could the RS be a family car? On paper and in theory, yes. In Normal mode, the ride was comfortable, the speed was impressive, but you could pop to the shops with your toddler in the back without drifting around corners and roundabouts.

    “The ride might be a tad too hard for a newborn, however, even in its softest mode — and in any of the firmer settings, I would definitely recommend investing in a good bra.

    “The rear doors don’t open particularly wide, so getting a toddler in and out could have been easier. But his car seat fitted in easily, with plenty of little-leg room.”

    Not your normal Ford Focus

    Our friends at Parkers have given us the full run-down of what to expect from the Ford Focus RS.

    While the Focus ST could be described as a warmed-up version of the standard car, the RS has had some substantial changes both under the bonnet and deep within its mechanical workings.

    Chief among this is an engine upgrade — you get a 2.3-litre petrol motor which produces 350hp and can accelerate from 0-62mph sprint in 4.7 seconds. Few cars you’ll encounter on your regular commute will be able to keep up.

    As you would imagine that level of performance needs tempering with a hefty dose of control, and in the Ford Focus RS that means all-wheel drive.

    What’s that all about?

    Your tyres are the only connection between you and the road. A small area of rubber known as the contact patch in a standard front-wheel drive Focus has to cope with all sorts of things - acceleration, braking and cornering forces — and when performance increases to the levels produced by the Focus RS, two wheels alone simply would not be able to cope.

    To combat this Ford has divided up the power produced by the Focus RS sending some of it to the rear wheels too. Even more cleverly, it uses a suite of sensors and processors to work out which wheels have grip and which don’t at any given point, sending more power here and less there, in order to keep you pointing in the right direction. In short, the Focus RS matches its impressive straight line speed with serious cornering grip.

    This system is also responsible for the car’s party trick — Drift Mode — which enables even the most ham-fisted driver to swing the back end of the car out in a huge slide and hold it there without crashing.

    That’s no good to me if it doesn’t have ISOFIX mounts any more

    Back to the point — does this car still work as a family hatchback? As fun as Drift Mode may sound, small children and the kind of g-forces it generates are not really compatible, unless you’ve got shares in a car valeting company. There also aren’t many places on the road where you can use it as it requires quite a bit of room for maneuver and a fairly substantial application of the throttle.

    There are other compromises too. That all-wheel drive system robs space from the boot, so you get 260 litres of space compared to 316 litres in the standard car. We still managed to get our Cosatto Fly pushchair in there but it would be worth taking yours to the showroom to check — some larger travel systems may not fold up small enough.

    You do still get two ISOFIX points on the outer rear seats and there’s plenty of room on the back bench to install child seats. Opt for the optional shell-backed bucket front seats and you’ll unlock even more room too, thanks to their thinness.

    Perhaps the biggest considerations here are the firmer ride (not unacceptably hard, but noticeably so) and the increased running costs - CO2 emissions of 175g/km will mean £210 in annual road tax at current 2016/17 rates, and a claimed fuel economy of 36.7mpg will be a hard target to hit.

    Verdict

    Ask yourself how often you are going to get to use the extra performance of the Focus RS —because if the answer is “not that frequently” then it’s likely the also-quite-fast but cheaper to run Focus ST will do the job.

    The good news is if you regularly find yourself on the right road with an empty car (or at the least understanding passengers) then there’s very little out there that can thrill like a Focus RS — certainly not for less than its £31,000 asking price.

    Want to know more? Read the Parkers full review and road test of the Ford Focus RS. They’ve also been running an RS long-term to see if the shine eventually wears off - read the full long-term review here.

    https://www.motherandbaby.co.uk/shop...y-a-family-car
    Last edited by Hoonigan; 03-24-2018 at 04:25 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Squid View Post
    Name:  1-rs-focus-buggy-12071612_w555.jpg
Views: 3274
Size:  81.6 KB

    by Adam Binnie

    The Focus RS is an odd combination of things — on one hand it’s one of the fastest, most extreme cars that Ford makes, but one the other it’s a five door hatchback with a big boot.

    Fast Fords have long been sold on this principle, weekday racers capable of shaming supercars that can settle down into the routine of family life on the weekend.

    Previous generations of the Focus ST (a model that sits above the diesel company car range and below the big-winged road rocket you see before you) have toed the line between speed and practicality very well — it’s arguably the ultimate fun family car.

    So can this even faster version pull off the same trick with the addition of even more performance, or has its core pragmatism been compromised in the pursuit of speed?

    M&B takes the Ford Focus RS for a spin

    Mother&Baby Web Editor Sophie Knight put the RS to the test, to see if it really could work as a family car.

    “Could the RS be a family car? On paper and in theory, yes. In Normal mode, the ride was comfortable, the speed was impressive, but you could pop to the shops with your toddler in the back without drifting around corners and roundabouts.

    “The ride might be a tad too hard for a newborn, however, even in its softest mode — and in any of the firmer settings, I would definitely recommend investing in a good bra.

    “The rear doors don’t open particularly wide, so getting a toddler in and out could have been easier. But his car seat fitted in easily, with plenty of little-leg room.”

    Not your normal Ford Focus

    Our friends at Parkers have given us the full run-down of what to expect from the Ford Focus RS.

    While the Focus ST could be described as a warmed-up version of the standard car, the RS has had some substantial changes both under the bonnet and deep within its mechanical workings.

    Chief among this is an engine upgrade — you get a 2.3-litre petrol motor which produces 350hp and can accelerate from 0-62mph sprint in 4.7 seconds. Few cars you’ll encounter on your regular commute will be able to keep up.

    As you would imagine that level of performance needs tempering with a hefty dose of control, and in the Ford Focus RS that means all-wheel drive.

    What’s that all about?

    Your tyres are the only connection between you and the road. A small area of rubber known as the contact patch in a standard front-wheel drive Focus has to cope with all sorts of things - acceleration, braking and cornering forces — and when performance increases to the levels produced by the Focus RS, two wheels alone simply would not be able to cope.

    To combat this Ford has divided up the power produced by the Focus RS sending some of it to the rear wheels too. Even more cleverly, it uses a suite of sensors and processors to work out which wheels have grip and which don’t at any given point, sending more power here and less there, in order to keep you pointing in the right direction. In short, the Focus RS matches its impressive straight line speed with serious cornering grip.

    This system is also responsible for the car’s party trick — Drift Mode — which enables even the most ham-fisted driver to swing the back end of the car out in a huge slide and hold it there without crashing.

    That’s no good to me if it doesn’t have ISOFIX mounts any more

    Back to the point — does this car still work as a family hatchback? As fun as Drift Mode may sound, small children and the kind of g-forces it generates are not really compatible, unless you’ve got shares in a car valeting company. There also aren’t many places on the road where you can use it as it requires quite a bit of room for maneuver and a fairly substantial application of the throttle.

    There are other compromises too. That all-wheel drive system robs space from the boot, so you get 260 litres of space compared to 316 litres in the standard car. We still managed to get our Cosatto Fly pushchair in there but it would be worth taking yours to the showroom to check — some larger travel systems may not fold up small enough.

    You do still get two ISOFIX points on the outer rear seats and there’s plenty of room on the back bench to install child seats. Opt for the optional shell-backed bucket front seats and you’ll unlock even more room too, thanks to their thinness.

    Perhaps the biggest considerations here are the firmer ride (not unacceptably hard, but noticeably so) and the increased running costs - CO2 emissions of 175g/km will mean £210 in annual road tax at current 2016/17 rates, and a claimed fuel economy of 36.7mpg will be a hard target to hit.

    Verdict

    Ask yourself how often you are going to get to use the extra performance of the Focus RS —because if the answer is “not that frequently” then it’s likely the also-quite-fast but cheaper to run Focus ST will do the job.

    The good news is if you regularly find yourself on the right road with an empty car (or at the least understanding passengers) then there’s very little out there that can thrill like a Focus RS — certainly not for less than its £31,000 asking price.

    Want to know more? Read the Parkers full review and road test of the Ford Focus RS. They’ve also been running an RS long-term to see if the shine eventually wears off - read the full long-term review here.

    https://www.motherandbaby.co.uk/shop...y-a-family-car
    Nobody is gonna read this post in full because:
    1. It is too long & boring
    2.The RS ain't a "family car".
    KeyserSoze likes this.

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    Too harsh for a newborn? My 5lb premie did just fine riding around in mine last summer. Running errands, changing her on the middle seat in parking lots, my wife feeding her in the back, Costco loads of diapers and wipes in the hatch. Now that she's bigger we have to get out of the car and put her across the back seat to change her. It may not be a mini-van but it does just fine as a small family car. The three of us have road tripped in it many times now, although if we're taking a longer trip we take the Forester so we can pack more into it. Around town it works perfectly and we don't think twice about taking my car.

    I think it's the ride and the lack of wind noise but she falls right asleep in it. It fits our stroller fine if I remove the trunk cover. Even with another person in the car it works fine as a day tripper.
    Last edited by hydrostream; 03-27-2018 at 04:23 PM.

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    If you don't value performance and fun then it's likely not worth the additional cost, maintenance, gas, and insurance than a Civic, Golf, regular Focus, etc. If you want a really fun quick car that is great in all weather but still practical when you need to haul people, kids, and stuff then this car makes a ton of sense.

    I got rid of a 2015 Honda Fit and 2016 C7 Z51 to simplify my life and the RS checks all the boxes for me.
    braap likes this.

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    "Perhaps the biggest considerations here are the firmer ride (not unacceptably hard, but noticeably so) and the increased running costs - CO2 emissions of 175g/km will mean £210 in annual road tax at current 2016/17 rates, and a claimed fuel economy of 36.7mpg will be a hard target to hit."

    are they using different miles over there? You'd have to drive like a grandma to even get 26 mpg and 36 sounds impossible.
    ardevas09 likes this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pressure drop View Post
    "Perhaps the biggest considerations here are the firmer ride (not unacceptably hard, but noticeably so) and the increased running costs - CO2 emissions of 175g/km will mean £210 in annual road tax at current 2016/17 rates, and a claimed fuel economy of 36.7mpg will be a hard target to hit."

    are they using different miles over there? You'd have to drive like a grandma to even get 26 mpg and 36 sounds impossible.
    Different gallons.
    pressure drop likes this.
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    Mother&Baby Web Editor Sophie Knight put the RS to the test, to see if it really could work as a family car.


    Welcome to the millennials
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    It is my family car. Already shopping for new new born seat for the car for when the grandkid arrives later this year. RECARO has as nice travel system for the really little ones that matches my son's RECARO booster fairly well. For my needs/desires there is no better car on the market right now, one of the main reasons I'm so pissed about these car, Ford built it wrong, but still love it.
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    Family car if the driver is short. There is no humanly way possible any kid or adult can sit behind me when I drive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Biz View Post
    Family car if the driver is short. There is no humanly way possible any kid or adult can sit behind me when I drive.
    Super long inseam and gorilla arms?
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